Now Playing

Today - Friday July 3, 2015

7:00pm

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



9:15pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Saturday July 4, 2015

11:30am

Toronto Beaches Film Festival: Start Local

Canada, 72 MINS, G

Dir: Nate Lacroix

Local filmmaker Nate Lacroix set out to discover what it really means to be ‘local’ in this feature length documentary that focuses on a small Ontario community and the people in it who support and encourage the local movement. The film examines what ‘local’ means through the words and wisdom of those who rely on their community to thrive as well as expert opinions on why adopting a more local lifestyle will improve our lives and the wellbeing of those around us. Screens with:

Alegria – A Humanitarian Expedition (28:44) *Canadian Premiere dir. Christoph von Toggenburg – Switzerland, India, Nepal

Happy Town: Surf Suit (5:49) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Fred Kroetsch – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
*
Actor, Producer in Attendance

Green Zombies (3:20) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Krishna  Devine – Los Angeles, California, USA

1:45pm

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



4:00pm

Toronto Beaches Film Festvial: Walking in Two Worlds

USA, 62 MINS, G

Dir: Bo Boudart

Worlds collide in the Tongass Forest, when the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act turns tribes into corporations and sparks a lengthy logging frenzy. A story of division and redemption plays out between a Tlingit brother and sister, showing the possibility of healing both the forest and the native community. Screens with: 

Sybil and Betts – Requiem for a Friendship (42:10) *World Premiere
dir. David Bajurny – Toronto, Canada
*Director in Attendance

7:00pm

3D Screening

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



9:15pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Sunday July 5, 2015

11:30am

Toronto Beaches Film Festival: Strange Rumblings in Shangri La

USA, 54 MINS, G

Dir: Joe (“Joe G”) Guglielmino

Strange Rumblings in Shangri La is a mix of high performance surfing and stunning cinematography that documents our unforgettable worldwide journey in search of surfing’s own Holy Grail. From the frigid waters of Iceland to the tropical beauty of Mozambique. From dreamy French beach breaks to exotic islands off the coast of Brazil, and into deepest Indonesia. Shot in 16mm film and created in the spirit of the classic films by Bruce Brown and Jacques Cousteau, Strange Rumblings in Shangri La will take you on an adventure you won’t soon forget. Screens with:

Bolero For Surfing In Moravia (35:08) *North American Premiere
dir. Valerio Mendoza Guillen – Czech Republic/Venezuela


Happy Town: Surf Suit (5:49) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Fred Kroetsch – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
*Actor, Producer in Attendance

Falling Stars (5:11) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Jared Price – Malibu, California, USA
*Director, Producer in Attendance

Voyage (4:47) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Shaughn Cameron – London, Ontario, Canada
*Director in Attendance

Green Zombies (3:20) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Krishna  Devine – Los Angeles, California, USA

2:00pm

Toronto Beaches Film Festival: Life's a Beach

UK, 53 MINS, G

Dir: John Baker

A documentary exploring what turned out to be Jerry ‘Mungo’ Francis final 19 months of life, as he took a stand against consumerist society, finding himself embroiled in legal battles with local government and Network Rail, after he set up home on a Folkestone beach. Mungo’s home, built out of old pallets and recycled beach refuse, represented not only his philosophies of sustainability, but also the heart of the local community. ‘Life’s a Beach’, follows Mungo’s experiences there; his challenges and triumphs, all leading to his tragic death, which confirmed the man a local legend. Screens with:

Voyage (4:47) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Shaughn Cameron – London, Ontario, Canada


Falling Stars (5:11) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Jared Price – Malibu, California, USA

*Director, Producer in Attendance

The Paddler Movie (43:42) *Toronto Premiere
dir. Carey Missler – Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
*Director in Attendance

4:00pm

Toronto Beaches Film Festival: Single in South Beach

USA, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Alejandro Itkin

Amy, an attractive and overconfident single woman, confuses love with money and becomes a victim of the materialistic nature of South Beach. The journey through her romantic relationships starts with Nick, a down-to-earth, young architect. Amy has dreams that Nick can’t fulfill, and although she loves him, she grows tired of his inability to afford the lifestyle South Beach demands.

In her search for glamour and a dancing career, Amy meets Sam, an older, married man who lives in New York. Even though Sam provides Amy with the luxurious lifestyle she desires, she begins to feel a void for love and attention. Unwilling to let go of Sam’s financial support, Amy becomes involved in a parallel relationship with Robert, who loves her but remains suspicious of her ways and motives.

 Amy’s double life reaches a point of no return, where she discovers that in South Beach, not everything is as good as it looks.

*Director in Attendance
**A Special SKYPE Q&A with Hollywood Actors
Kevin Sorbo and Carlos Ponce

Screens with: 

Green Zombies (3:20) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Krishna  Devine – Los Angeles, California, USA

Happy Town: Surf Suit (5:49) *Canadian Premiere
dir. Fred Kroetsch – Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
*Actor, Producer in Attendance

7:00pm

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



9:15pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Monday July 6, 2015

7:00pm

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



9:15pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Tuesday July 7, 2015

6:45pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



9:20pm

Woman in Gold

2015, UK/USA, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Simon Curtis
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Helen Mirren

Woman in Gold is the extraordinary story of a Gustav Klimt painting. We open with a brief scene of Klimt, played with a guffaw-inducing, Rasputin-like beard by the German actor Moritz Bleibtreu, as he puts the finishing touches to his 1907 masterpiece, Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I. Confiscated by the Nazis from the Bloch-Bauer mansion in Vienna, this glittering work came to be installed in Austria’s Belvedere Gallery after the war, where it could easily have hung as a permanent national treasure.

That, though, would have been reckoning without the passion and persistence of Maria Altmann, Adele’s niece, who waited until her eighties to chase down the inheritance she argued was rightfully hers.

In the role of this elegant, haunted Jewish émigrée, Helen Mirren carries the film with her customarily unflappable star power: she serves up strudel, glowers at the Austrian art authorities, and approximates a Mitteleuropean accent softened by Maria’s years of living in America.

 

Tim Robey, The Telegraph



Wednesday July 8, 2015

7:00pm

The Salt of the Earth

2015, France/Brazil, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, Wim Wenders
Starring: Sebastião Salgado, Wim Wenders, Juliano Ribeiro

As the film reveals, the Brazilian-born Sebastiao Salgado originally studied economics and worked for the World Bank in France after being exiled from his home country in 1969, before deciding to give it all up in order to pursue a career in photography. After his first major project, a photographic chronicle of South America that allowed him to at least get near to his homeland (his exile would eventually end in 1980), he began a series of expansive projects in which he used his keen eye and ability to create striking images to create works that allowed viewers to bear witness to glimmers of hope and humanity in the face of almost unimaginable misery. "The Workers," for example, famously illustrated such locations as a massive Sierra Pelada mine and the countless people employed to dig out the gold in the hopes that their back-breaking labor will one day pay off and the burning oil fields of Kuwait in the wake of Desert Storm. "Sahel," which he produced in conjunction with Doctors Without Borders, looked at the famine in Ethiopia and the attempt by many to journey to what they hoped to be a better life in the Sudan. In a similar vein, "Exodus" looked at the plight of refugees from Rwanda and Yugoslavia during their respective troubles in the Nineties. "The Salt of the Earth" is a visually stunning and oftentimes affecting tribute to one artist from another. Peter Sobczynski, RogerEbert.com

9:15pm

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief

2014, USA, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alex Gibney
Starring: Lawrence Wright, Mike Rinder

Following Mea Maxima Culpa, his investigation into the Catholic Church, Academy Award-winner Alex Gibney turns his gaze to Scientology in Going Clear, based on the book of the same name by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright.

Gibney profiles eight former members of the Church of Scientology, whose most prominent adherents include A-list Hollywood celebrities, shining a light on how the church cultivates true believers, including their experiences and what they are willing to do in the name of religion. The film covers a broad range of material from the church's origins—punctuated by an intimate portrait of founder L. Ron Hubbard—to present-day practices and alleged abuses as reported in the media.

Fearless and fascinating, this latest cinematic opus from the man Esquire dubbed "the most important documentarian of our time" is a powerful exploration of the psychological impact of blind faith—what Lawrence Wright calls the "prison of belief." 



Thursday July 9, 2015

7:00pm

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief

2014, USA, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: Alex Gibney
Starring: Lawrence Wright, Mike Rinder

Following Mea Maxima Culpa, his investigation into the Catholic Church, Academy Award-winner Alex Gibney turns his gaze to Scientology in Going Clear, based on the book of the same name by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright.

Gibney profiles eight former members of the Church of Scientology, whose most prominent adherents include A-list Hollywood celebrities, shining a light on how the church cultivates true believers, including their experiences and what they are willing to do in the name of religion. The film covers a broad range of material from the church's origins—punctuated by an intimate portrait of founder L. Ron Hubbard—to present-day practices and alleged abuses as reported in the media.

Fearless and fascinating, this latest cinematic opus from the man Esquire dubbed "the most important documentarian of our time" is a powerful exploration of the psychological impact of blind faith—what Lawrence Wright calls the "prison of belief." 



9:20pm

The Salt of the Earth

2015, France/Brazil, 110 MINS, PG

Dir: Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, Wim Wenders
Starring: Sebastião Salgado, Wim Wenders, Juliano Ribeiro

As the film reveals, the Brazilian-born Sebastiao Salgado originally studied economics and worked for the World Bank in France after being exiled from his home country in 1969, before deciding to give it all up in order to pursue a career in photography. After his first major project, a photographic chronicle of South America that allowed him to at least get near to his homeland (his exile would eventually end in 1980), he began a series of expansive projects in which he used his keen eye and ability to create striking images to create works that allowed viewers to bear witness to glimmers of hope and humanity in the face of almost unimaginable misery. "The Workers," for example, famously illustrated such locations as a massive Sierra Pelada mine and the countless people employed to dig out the gold in the hopes that their back-breaking labor will one day pay off and the burning oil fields of Kuwait in the wake of Desert Storm. "Sahel," which he produced in conjunction with Doctors Without Borders, looked at the famine in Ethiopia and the attempt by many to journey to what they hoped to be a better life in the Sudan. In a similar vein, "Exodus" looked at the plight of refugees from Rwanda and Yugoslavia during their respective troubles in the Nineties. "The Salt of the Earth" is a visually stunning and oftentimes affecting tribute to one artist from another. Peter Sobczynski, RogerEbert.com

Friday July 10, 2015

7:00pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

9:00pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

Saturday July 11, 2015

2:00pm

Tomorrowland

2015, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Brad Bird
Starring: George Clooney, Britt Robertson, Hugh Laurie

A smart young girl named Casey (Britt Robertson), discovers the futuristic world of Tomorrowland and becomes obsessed with the idea of finding a way to get there. Helping her along the way is Athena (Raffey Cassidy), an android who looks like a young girl, and Frank (George Clooney), who has grown into a bitter old man. 

Taking on his second live-action feature effort, Brad Bird has once again created a visual splendor in Tomorrowland. The vision of Tomorrowland is really a sight to behold – filled with functioning jetpacks, futuristic architecture, diving pools that float in mid-air and more. The most impressive shot in the movie is what looks like a long, single take that maps out the expansive world and everything it has to offer. Eric Eisenberg, CinemaBlend 




4:30pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

7:00pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

9:00pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

Sunday July 12, 2015

2:00pm

Tomorrowland

2015, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Brad Bird
Starring: George Clooney, Britt Robertson, Hugh Laurie

A smart young girl named Casey (Britt Robertson), discovers the futuristic world of Tomorrowland and becomes obsessed with the idea of finding a way to get there. Helping her along the way is Athena (Raffey Cassidy), an android who looks like a young girl, and Frank (George Clooney), who has grown into a bitter old man. 

Taking on his second live-action feature effort, Brad Bird has once again created a visual splendor in Tomorrowland. The vision of Tomorrowland is really a sight to behold – filled with functioning jetpacks, futuristic architecture, diving pools that float in mid-air and more. The most impressive shot in the movie is what looks like a long, single take that maps out the expansive world and everything it has to offer. Eric Eisenberg, CinemaBlend 




4:30pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

7:00pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

9:00pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

Monday July 13, 2015

7:00pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

9:00pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

Tuesday July 14, 2015

7:00pm

Spy

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Paul Figg
Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Rose Byrne, Jude Law

Paul Feig’s The Heat took a genre that has traditionally belonged to men — the buddy cop movie — and gave it a female twist. Feig’s new movie, Spy, does much the same thing, this time for spy films, a world that has long been by, about, and for dudes and their power fantasies. Spy explicitly subverts the genre’s typical gender dynamics by casting Melissa McCarthy as a lowly, desk-bound CIA analyst named Susan Cooper, who has spent her entire career in the shadow of a glamorous James Bond-esque spy (Jude Law) and then finally gets her opportunity to step into the spotlight and become a full-fledged field agent. Matt Singer, ScreenCrush

9:20pm

I'll See You in My Dreams

2015, USA, 96 MINS, PG

Dir: Brett Haley
Starring: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott

It’s always a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a movie. And it’s even more of a pleasure to see Blythe Danner in a good movie. No, not a good movie. A really good movie. Which “I’ll See You In My Dreams” actually is. The long-widowed Carol has a pretty well-ordered life. She gets up early in the morning, does the housekeeping she needs to do, has a regular bridge game with some old friends who live at a nearby senior community, and so on. But she’s a bit disconnected from her friends, because she’s opted to live in a house of her own, and after the dog is gone, her life’s a little more lonely. Disorder enters in the form of a black rat in the house; Carol asks the new pool-cleaning guy, Lloyd (Martin Starr), to investigate. A weird, tentative friendship starts blooming between the aimless, bearded, much younger Lloyd and Carol. He takes her out to a karaoke bar where her long-lost identity as a singer reasserts itself in an impressive way, as Carol/Blythe really lays into “Cry Me A River.” The pair looks askance at each other when the idea of a romance rears its head—there’s an age difference of like four decades here!—but then you think you see them thinking, “Well, why not?” Before that question gets past the implied stage, Carol, after a disastrous senior-speed-dating session, accepts a date request from Bill, who’s played by Sam Elliott. Being played by Sam Elliott in itself implies a lot, and his Bill is a laid-back delight, taking Carol out on his boat, which he’s christened “So What,” after the Miles Davis tune. When Carol picks up the reference, Bill is duly impressed, and it’s, um, smooth sailing for their romance. Until it’s not. Glenn Kenny, RogerEbert.com

Wednesday July 15, 2015

7:00pm

Sunshine on Leith

2013, England, 100 MINS, PG

Dir: Dexter Fletcher
Starring: Paul Brannigan, George MacKay, Kevin Guthrie

Lifelong best pals Davy (George MacKay) and Ally (Kevin Guthrie) have returned home to Edinburgh after a tour of duty in Afghanistan, having survived a road mine explosion that killed or maimed several comrades. Now it’s back to the everyday business of finding work, with telemarketing seemingly the only option. Ally reunites with Davy’s sister Liz (Freya Mavor), though his hopes for a conventional domestic future together don’t mesh with her hunger to “see the world.” She sets Davy up with her hospital co-worker Yvonne (Antonia Thomas), a recent London transplant, and they hit it off pretty well.

Meanwhile, the siblings’ parents (Peter MullanJane Horrocks) are about to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary, though Dad’s discovery that he has a previously unknown adult daughter by another woman throws their marriage into sudden turmoil. Just as all three women are on the outs with their men, a conveniently timed medical crisis brings everyone back to their senses. Twee, sentimental and boisterous, “Sunshine on Leith” is a stage-to-screen jukebox musical that some will find irresistible based on 13 songs from the Proclaimers’ songbook. Dennis Harvey, Variety



9:10pm

While We're Young

2015, USA, 97 MINS, 14A

Dir: Noah Baumbach
Starring: Naomi Watts, Ben Stiller

Ben Stiller is Josh Srebnick, a once-promising documentary film-maker who quotes Godard (“fiction is about me, documentary is about you”) and cites Pennebaker, Wiseman and the Maysles as his glib guiding lights. Josh has been working on his current film (“it’s really about America”) for a decade, and now has a six-and-a-half-hour cut witheringly described by his feted documentarist father-in-law Leslie Breitbart (Charles Grodin) as “seven hours too long”. Josh says he’s on the brink of completion, but he can’t finish anything, a truth of which his wife, Cornelia (Naomi Watts), is increasingly aware. Childless and becalmed, the couple have become what Woody Allen would call “a dead shark”.

Then an apparently chance meeting with free-spirited young couple Jamie and Darby (Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried) seems to revivify Josh and Cornelia’s lives, reminding them of the idealistic, carefree souls they once were. Next thing you know, Josh (whom Jamie toe-curlingly dubs “Yosh” or “Joshie”) is wearing hats and riding bicycles, while Cornelia is going to hip-hop dance classes and enjoying drug-addled snogs at goofy ayahuasca gatherings.



Thursday July 16, 2015

7:00pm

Sunshine on Leith

2013, England, 100 MINS, PG

Dir: Dexter Fletcher
Starring: Paul Brannigan, George MacKay, Kevin Guthrie

Lifelong best pals Davy (George MacKay) and Ally (Kevin Guthrie) have returned home to Edinburgh after a tour of duty in Afghanistan, having survived a road mine explosion that killed or maimed several comrades. Now it’s back to the everyday business of finding work, with telemarketing seemingly the only option. Ally reunites with Davy’s sister Liz (Freya Mavor), though his hopes for a conventional domestic future together don’t mesh with her hunger to “see the world.” She sets Davy up with her hospital co-worker Yvonne (Antonia Thomas), a recent London transplant, and they hit it off pretty well.

Meanwhile, the siblings’ parents (Peter MullanJane Horrocks) are about to celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary, though Dad’s discovery that he has a previously unknown adult daughter by another woman throws their marriage into sudden turmoil. Just as all three women are on the outs with their men, a conveniently timed medical crisis brings everyone back to their senses. Twee, sentimental and boisterous, “Sunshine on Leith” is a stage-to-screen jukebox musical that some will find irresistible based on 13 songs from the Proclaimers’ songbook. Dennis Harvey, Variety



9:10pm

While We're Young

2015, USA, 97 MINS, 14A

Dir: Noah Baumbach
Starring: Naomi Watts, Ben Stiller

Ben Stiller is Josh Srebnick, a once-promising documentary film-maker who quotes Godard (“fiction is about me, documentary is about you”) and cites Pennebaker, Wiseman and the Maysles as his glib guiding lights. Josh has been working on his current film (“it’s really about America”) for a decade, and now has a six-and-a-half-hour cut witheringly described by his feted documentarist father-in-law Leslie Breitbart (Charles Grodin) as “seven hours too long”. Josh says he’s on the brink of completion, but he can’t finish anything, a truth of which his wife, Cornelia (Naomi Watts), is increasingly aware. Childless and becalmed, the couple have become what Woody Allen would call “a dead shark”.

Then an apparently chance meeting with free-spirited young couple Jamie and Darby (Adam Driver and Amanda Seyfried) seems to revivify Josh and Cornelia’s lives, reminding them of the idealistic, carefree souls they once were. Next thing you know, Josh (whom Jamie toe-curlingly dubs “Yosh” or “Joshie”) is wearing hats and riding bicycles, while Cornelia is going to hip-hop dance classes and enjoying drug-addled snogs at goofy ayahuasca gatherings.



Friday July 17, 2015

7:00pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



9:20pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Saturday July 18, 2015

2:00pm

Tomorrowland

2015, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Brad Bird
Starring: George Clooney, Britt Robertson, Hugh Laurie

A smart young girl named Casey (Britt Robertson), discovers the futuristic world of Tomorrowland and becomes obsessed with the idea of finding a way to get there. Helping her along the way is Athena (Raffey Cassidy), an android who looks like a young girl, and Frank (George Clooney), who has grown into a bitter old man. 

Taking on his second live-action feature effort, Brad Bird has once again created a visual splendor in Tomorrowland. The vision of Tomorrowland is really a sight to behold – filled with functioning jetpacks, futuristic architecture, diving pools that float in mid-air and more. The most impressive shot in the movie is what looks like a long, single take that maps out the expansive world and everything it has to offer. Eric Eisenberg, CinemaBlend 




4:30pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



7:00pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



9:20pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Sunday July 19, 2015

1:30pm

Tomorrowland

2015, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Brad Bird
Starring: George Clooney, Britt Robertson, Hugh Laurie

A smart young girl named Casey (Britt Robertson), discovers the futuristic world of Tomorrowland and becomes obsessed with the idea of finding a way to get there. Helping her along the way is Athena (Raffey Cassidy), an android who looks like a young girl, and Frank (George Clooney), who has grown into a bitter old man. 

Taking on his second live-action feature effort, Brad Bird has once again created a visual splendor in Tomorrowland. The vision of Tomorrowland is really a sight to behold – filled with functioning jetpacks, futuristic architecture, diving pools that float in mid-air and more. The most impressive shot in the movie is what looks like a long, single take that maps out the expansive world and everything it has to offer. Eric Eisenberg, CinemaBlend 




4:00pm

Private Rental

0 MINS, G

7:00pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



9:20pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Monday July 20, 2015

7:00pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



9:20pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Tuesday July 21, 2015

7:00pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

9:20pm

Far From the Madding Crowd

2015, England, 118 MINS, PG

Dir: Thomas Vinterberg
Starring: Carey Mulligan, Matthias Schoenaerts

The new Far From The Madding Crowd crams the novel into a brisk, compact two hours, offers a love letter to the rugged beauty of Dorset and boasts a strong, unexpected cast led by a charismatic Carey Mulligan as Hardy's heroine Bathsheba Everdene. Mulligan's Bathsheba seems a more fragile, vulnerable character than Julie Christie's impetuous, headstrong lass. Perhaps that makes her a more sympathetic figure as she fights the suffocatingly narrow expectations of Victorian England and the capricious nature of her own heart. "I shall astonish you all," she famously declares in a moment of nervous bravado rather than reckless intent.

The film really does capture a feel for the period, the land and the changing seasons, from the golden glow of summer haystacks to the lonely chill of a bitter winter landscape. Far From The Madding Crowd is a tale of broken hearts, terrible twists of fate and reversals of fortune as the orphaned Bathsheba rises in the world, inheriting land and social standing. Allan Hunter, Express



Wednesday July 22, 2015

7:00pm

Mad Max

1980, Australia, 92 MINS, R

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Mel Gibson, Hugh Keays-Byrne, Steve Bisley

Mel Gibson gives a rousing performance as Max Rockatansky, a police force officer who is known for his wild acts that challenge the very nature of a local gang called the Acolytes. They’re ruining civilization and giving the police force a run for their money. What is so unique about “Mad Max” is that its revenge tale doesn’t get in to action until the final half hour, as Miller devotes a majority of the narrative to a crime thriller about assassinations, and biker gangs running amok. Max Rockatansky is a powder keg waiting to explode, and he eventually becomes Mad Max after losing his son and wife to the Acolytes and their terrorism. Gibson cuts his teeth on this movie, portraying a clean cut and very wide eyed young man who begins seeing the worst violence imaginable. - Felix Vasquez for cinema-crazed.com

9:00pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Thursday July 23, 2015

7:00pm

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

1981, Australia, 92 MINS, R

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Mel Gibson, Bruce Spence, Virginia Hey

This wild sequel to Mad Max, the Australian box-office smash, is a rousing tale of survival set in a grim future. The world is a combat zone ruled by violent crazies clad in leather jackets. A group of decent folk make their last stand against the marauders at a decrepit oil refinery. Max (Mel Gibson from Gallipoli), the strong and silent outsider, agrees to help them break away to freedom on the seacoast. The battle/chases sequence that follows is an adrenalin-pumping spree. - Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat

9:00pm

3D Screening

Mad Max: Fury Road 3D

2015, Australia, 120 MINS, 14A

Dir: George Miller
Starring: Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron

The movie is set in the near future. There are no cities or civilizations left. The landscape is dying of thirst; water—known as Aqua Cola—is severely rationed; and other resources, notably gasoline, are hoarded and tussled over like scraps of food. Max is a survivor, like everyone else, and, as we join the stream of action, he is captured and hauled into servitude at the Citadel. Girded with towers of rock, this is the desert stronghold of Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne), a monstrous figure who lords it over a swarm of ragged wretches. His toadlike skin is caged in a transparent breastplate, and he breathes through a mask that’s armed with yellowing horses’ teeth and fed by bellows that wheeze up and down on the back of his neck. Probably a charming fellow, once you get to know him.

“Mad Max: Fury Road” exists in a different league than its predecessors. It lies way, way beyond Thunderdome, and marks one of the few occasions on which a late sequel outdoes what came before. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

Friday July 24, 2015

6:45pm

Pitch Perfect 2

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Elizabeth Banks
Starring: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson

When Beyonce’s brisk female-empowerment jam “Run the World (Girls)” kicks off a key musical number in “Pitch Perfect 2,” it plays as something of a mission statement for the film itself: Both behind and in front of the camera, women call every shot of consequence in this ebulliently entertaining, arguably superior sequel to the 2012 musical comedy hit. Continuing the bawdy misadventures of all-girl college a cappella group the Barden Bellas — this time as they get their motley act together on a global stage — Kay Cannon’s script is even lighter on narrative than its predecessor, but fills any resulting void with a concentrated supply of riotous gags, and a renewed emphasis on the virtues of female collaboration and independence. Actress-producer Elizabeth Banks’ eminently credible feature directing debut should, in its own parlance, crush it at the global box office, sustaining a franchise with potential to outlive the “Glee” fever that inspired it. Guy Lodge, Variety



9:15pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Saturday July 25, 2015

1:30pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



4:20pm

Pitch Perfect 2

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Elizabeth Banks
Starring: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson

When Beyonce’s brisk female-empowerment jam “Run the World (Girls)” kicks off a key musical number in “Pitch Perfect 2,” it plays as something of a mission statement for the film itself: Both behind and in front of the camera, women call every shot of consequence in this ebulliently entertaining, arguably superior sequel to the 2012 musical comedy hit. Continuing the bawdy misadventures of all-girl college a cappella group the Barden Bellas — this time as they get their motley act together on a global stage — Kay Cannon’s script is even lighter on narrative than its predecessor, but fills any resulting void with a concentrated supply of riotous gags, and a renewed emphasis on the virtues of female collaboration and independence. Actress-producer Elizabeth Banks’ eminently credible feature directing debut should, in its own parlance, crush it at the global box office, sustaining a franchise with potential to outlive the “Glee” fever that inspired it. Guy Lodge, Variety



7:00pm

Pitch Perfect 2

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Elizabeth Banks
Starring: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson

When Beyonce’s brisk female-empowerment jam “Run the World (Girls)” kicks off a key musical number in “Pitch Perfect 2,” it plays as something of a mission statement for the film itself: Both behind and in front of the camera, women call every shot of consequence in this ebulliently entertaining, arguably superior sequel to the 2012 musical comedy hit. Continuing the bawdy misadventures of all-girl college a cappella group the Barden Bellas — this time as they get their motley act together on a global stage — Kay Cannon’s script is even lighter on narrative than its predecessor, but fills any resulting void with a concentrated supply of riotous gags, and a renewed emphasis on the virtues of female collaboration and independence. Actress-producer Elizabeth Banks’ eminently credible feature directing debut should, in its own parlance, crush it at the global box office, sustaining a franchise with potential to outlive the “Glee” fever that inspired it. Guy Lodge, Variety



9:20pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



Sunday July 26, 2015

1:30pm

3D Screening

Avengers: Age of Ultron 3D

2015, USA, 141 MINS, PG

Dir: Joss Whedon
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Following the events of The AvengersIron Man 3Thor: The Dark World, and Captain America: The Winter SoldierAge of Ultron finds the titular heroes on a campaign to apprehend Hydra loyalists and secure alien technologies (that have fallen into the wrong hands). The crusade brings Iron Man, Captain America, Black Widow, Hulk, Thor, and Hawkeye to the doorstep of Baron Strucker – a Hydra officer who has been experimenting on Loki’s scepter in the hopes of harnessing its power. Ben Kendrick, ScreenRant



4:20pm

Pitch Perfect 2

2015, USA, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Elizabeth Banks
Starring: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson

When Beyonce’s brisk female-empowerment jam “Run the World (Girls)” kicks off a key musical number in “Pitch Perfect 2,” it plays as something of a mission statement for the film itself: Both behind and in front of the camera, women call every shot of consequence in this ebulliently entertaining, arguably superior sequel to the 2012 musical comedy hit. Continuing the bawdy misadventures of all-girl college a cappella group the Barden Bellas — this time as they get their motley act together on a global stage — Kay Cannon’s script is even lighter on narrative than its predecessor, but fills any resulting void with a concentrated supply of riotous gags, and a renewed emphasis on the virtues of female collaboration and independence. Actress-producer Elizabeth Banks’ eminently credible feature directing debut should, in its own parlance, crush it at the global box office, sustaining a franchise with potential to outlive the “Glee” fever that inspired it. Guy Lodge, Variety



7:00pm

Dr. No

1962, UK, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Terence Young
Starring: Sean Connery, Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman

First screen adventure of Ian Fleming's hardhitting, fearless, imperturbable, girl-loving Secret Service Agent 007, James Bond, is an entertaining piece of tongue-in-cheek action hokum. Sean Connery excellently puts over a cool, fearless, on-the-ball, fictional Secret Service guy.

9:20pm

From Russia with Love

1963, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Terence Young
Starring: Sean Connery, Robert Shaw, Lotte Lenya

"From Russia with Love" (1963) is one of the best James Bond movies and one of the first sequels to surpass the success of an original entry ("Dr. No"). Its existence represents a crucial reason for the series having lasted until today.

"From Russia with Love" deals with the defection of a beautiful Russian embassy employee in Istanbul who seeks political asylum in the U.K. in exchange for a Lektor decoding machine, an intriguing-sounding Maguffin that, as such, is of no further consequence. Her only other condition is for Agent 007 to be the one assigned to collect her in Turkey, claiming she has fallen in love with him through his photograph. Behind what the English see as an obvious trap from the Russians is SPECTRE's nefarious plan to pit the superpowers against each other. They provide Bond with an evil guardian angel of sorts to assist him in unwittingly accomplishing their own goals. -Gerardo Valero, RogerEbert.com

Monday July 27, 2015

7:00pm

Goldfinger

1964, UK, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Guy Hamilton
Starring: Sean Connery, Gert Fröbe, Honor Blackman

Of all the Bonds, "Goldfinger" (1964) is the best, and can stand as a surrogate for the others. If it is not a great film, it is a great entertainment, and contains all the elements of the Bond formula that would work again and again. It's also interesting as the link between the more modest first two Bonds and the later big-budget extravaganzas; after this one, producers Albert "Cubby" Broccoli and Harry Saltzman could be certain that 007 was good for the long run.

At 111 minutes, "Goldfinger" ties with "Dr. No" as the shortest of the James Bond films, and yet it probably contains more durable images than any other title in the series: the young woman killed by being coated with gold paint; the steel-rimmed bowler of the mute Korean assassin Odd Job (Harold Sakata); the Aston-Martin tricked out with deadly gimmicks and an ejector seat; Bond's sexy karate match with Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman); the villain Goldfinger with his gold-plated Rolls-Royce, and of course the laser beam pointed at that portion of Bond's lower anatomy that he most required if he were to continue as hero of the series.

The Broccoli-Saltzman formula found its lasting form in the making of "Goldfinger." The outline was emerging in the first two films, and here it is complete. - Roger Ebert



9:15pm

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

1969, UK, 142 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter R. Hunt
Starring: George Lazenby, Diana Rigg, Telly Savalas

James Bond woos a mob boss's daughter and goes undercover to uncover the true reason for Blofeld's allergy research in the Swiss Alps that involves beautiful women from around the world. -IMDB

Tuesday July 28, 2015

7:00pm

Live and Let Die

1973, 121 MINS, PG

Dir: Guy Hamilton
Starring: Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto, Jane Seymour

After dealing with SPECTRE and megalomaniacs for his first seven films, Bond is pitted against a different kind of villain in Live and Let Die -- the conscienceless Dr. Kananga (Yaphet Kotto), the ruler of a small Caribbean island and would-be monopolistic heroin supplier. When three British agents are murdered, Bond is sent to investigate. With an assist from old pal Felix Leiter (David Hedison, the only man to play the role more than once), 007 begins his scrutiny of Kananga. The resulting search leads him from Harlem to the Louisiana bayous, and has him meeting a beautiful Tarot priestess named Solitaire (Jane Seymour), a sinister voodoo doctor (Geoffrey Holder -- the man with the golden laugh), and a modern-day Captain Hook (Julius W. Harris). -James Berardinelli, reelviews.net

9:20pm

The Spy Who Loved Me

1977, 125 MINS, PG

Dir: Lewis Gilbert
Starring: Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Curd Jürgens

In a globe-trotting assignment that has him skiing off the edges of cliffs and driving a car deep underwater, British super-spy James Bond (Roger Moore) unites with sexy Russian agent Anya Amasova (Barbara Bach) to defeat megalomaniac shipping magnate Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens), who is threatening to destroy New York City with nuclear weapons. Bond's most deadly adversary on the case is Stromberg's henchman, Jaws (Richard Kiel), a seven-foot giant with terrifying steel teeth.

Wednesday July 29, 2015

6:45pm

On Her Majesty's Secret Service

1969, UK, 142 MINS, PG

Dir: Peter R. Hunt
Starring: George Lazenby, Diana Rigg, Telly Savalas

James Bond woos a mob boss's daughter and goes undercover to uncover the true reason for Blofeld's allergy research in the Swiss Alps that involves beautiful women from around the world. -IMDB

9:30pm

Dr. No

1962, UK, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Terence Young
Starring: Sean Connery, Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman

First screen adventure of Ian Fleming's hardhitting, fearless, imperturbable, girl-loving Secret Service Agent 007, James Bond, is an entertaining piece of tongue-in-cheek action hokum. Sean Connery excellently puts over a cool, fearless, on-the-ball, fictional Secret Service guy.

Thursday July 30, 2015

7:00pm

From Russia with Love

1963, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Terence Young
Starring: Sean Connery, Robert Shaw, Lotte Lenya

"From Russia with Love" (1963) is one of the best James Bond movies and one of the first sequels to surpass the success of an original entry ("Dr. No"). Its existence represents a crucial reason for the series having lasted until today.

"From Russia with Love" deals with the defection of a beautiful Russian embassy employee in Istanbul who seeks political asylum in the U.K. in exchange for a Lektor decoding machine, an intriguing-sounding Maguffin that, as such, is of no further consequence. Her only other condition is for Agent 007 to be the one assigned to collect her in Turkey, claiming she has fallen in love with him through his photograph. Behind what the English see as an obvious trap from the Russians is SPECTRE's nefarious plan to pit the superpowers against each other. They provide Bond with an evil guardian angel of sorts to assist him in unwittingly accomplishing their own goals. -Gerardo Valero, RogerEbert.com

9:20pm

Goldfinger

1964, UK, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Guy Hamilton
Starring: Sean Connery, Gert Fröbe, Honor Blackman

Of all the Bonds, "Goldfinger" (1964) is the best, and can stand as a surrogate for the others. If it is not a great film, it is a great entertainment, and contains all the elements of the Bond formula that would work again and again. It's also interesting as the link between the more modest first two Bonds and the later big-budget extravaganzas; after this one, producers Albert "Cubby" Broccoli and Harry Saltzman could be certain that 007 was good for the long run.

At 111 minutes, "Goldfinger" ties with "Dr. No" as the shortest of the James Bond films, and yet it probably contains more durable images than any other title in the series: the young woman killed by being coated with gold paint; the steel-rimmed bowler of the mute Korean assassin Odd Job (Harold Sakata); the Aston-Martin tricked out with deadly gimmicks and an ejector seat; Bond's sexy karate match with Pussy Galore (Honor Blackman); the villain Goldfinger with his gold-plated Rolls-Royce, and of course the laser beam pointed at that portion of Bond's lower anatomy that he most required if he were to continue as hero of the series.

The Broccoli-Saltzman formula found its lasting form in the making of "Goldfinger." The outline was emerging in the first two films, and here it is complete. - Roger Ebert



July 2015

S M T W T F S
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1

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