Now Playing

Today - Tuesday September 30, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Wednesday October 1, 2014

6:45pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:15pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Thursday October 2, 2014

6:45pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:15pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Friday October 3, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The November Man

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Roger Donaldson
Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Luke Bracey

Pierce Brosnan hasn't lost a step since his days playing James Bond, and even at 60, he's still got the sexy swagger you fell in love with in GoldenEye. 

Peter Devereaux (Brosnan) is an ex-CIA agent who's spent the last five years enjoying the quiet life in Switzerland. But when he's dragged out of retirement for one last mission, Devereaux soon finds himself the target of his old friend and CIA protégé David Mason (Luke Bracey). With growing suspicions of a mole within the agency, there's no one Devereaux can trust -- no rules and no holds barred.

Saturday October 4, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The November Man

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Roger Donaldson
Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Luke Bracey

Pierce Brosnan hasn't lost a step since his days playing James Bond, and even at 60, he's still got the sexy swagger you fell in love with in GoldenEye. 

Peter Devereaux (Brosnan) is an ex-CIA agent who's spent the last five years enjoying the quiet life in Switzerland. But when he's dragged out of retirement for one last mission, Devereaux soon finds himself the target of his old friend and CIA protégé David Mason (Luke Bracey). With growing suspicions of a mole within the agency, there's no one Devereaux can trust -- no rules and no holds barred.

Sunday October 5, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The November Man

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Roger Donaldson
Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Luke Bracey

Pierce Brosnan hasn't lost a step since his days playing James Bond, and even at 60, he's still got the sexy swagger you fell in love with in GoldenEye. 

Peter Devereaux (Brosnan) is an ex-CIA agent who's spent the last five years enjoying the quiet life in Switzerland. But when he's dragged out of retirement for one last mission, Devereaux soon finds himself the target of his old friend and CIA protégé David Mason (Luke Bracey). With growing suspicions of a mole within the agency, there's no one Devereaux can trust -- no rules and no holds barred.

Monday October 6, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The November Man

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Roger Donaldson
Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Luke Bracey

Pierce Brosnan hasn't lost a step since his days playing James Bond, and even at 60, he's still got the sexy swagger you fell in love with in GoldenEye. 

Peter Devereaux (Brosnan) is an ex-CIA agent who's spent the last five years enjoying the quiet life in Switzerland. But when he's dragged out of retirement for one last mission, Devereaux soon finds himself the target of his old friend and CIA protégé David Mason (Luke Bracey). With growing suspicions of a mole within the agency, there's no one Devereaux can trust -- no rules and no holds barred.

Tuesday October 7, 2014

7:00pm

The November Man

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Roger Donaldson
Starring: Pierce Brosnan, Luke Bracey

Pierce Brosnan hasn't lost a step since his days playing James Bond, and even at 60, he's still got the sexy swagger you fell in love with in GoldenEye. 

Peter Devereaux (Brosnan) is an ex-CIA agent who's spent the last five years enjoying the quiet life in Switzerland. But when he's dragged out of retirement for one last mission, Devereaux soon finds himself the target of his old friend and CIA protégé David Mason (Luke Bracey). With growing suspicions of a mole within the agency, there's no one Devereaux can trust -- no rules and no holds barred.

9:15pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



Wednesday October 8, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



Thursday October 9, 2014

6:45pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



9:15pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



Friday October 10, 2014

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Saturday October 11, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D

2014, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jonathan Liebesman
Starring: Megan Fox, Will Arnett, William Fichtner, Whoopi Goldberg

The city needs heroes. Darkness has settled over New York City as Shredder and his evil Foot Clan have an iron grip on everything from the police to the politicians. The future is grim until four unlikely outcast brothers rise from the sewers and discover their destiny as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The Turtles must work with fearless reporter April O'Neil (Megan Fox) and her wise-cracking cameraman Vern Fenwick (Will Arnett) to save the city and unravel Shredder's diabolical plan.(c) Paramount

4:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Sunday October 12, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D

2014, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jonathan Liebesman
Starring: Megan Fox, Will Arnett, William Fichtner, Whoopi Goldberg

The city needs heroes. Darkness has settled over New York City as Shredder and his evil Foot Clan have an iron grip on everything from the police to the politicians. The future is grim until four unlikely outcast brothers rise from the sewers and discover their destiny as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The Turtles must work with fearless reporter April O'Neil (Megan Fox) and her wise-cracking cameraman Vern Fenwick (Will Arnett) to save the city and unravel Shredder's diabolical plan.(c) Paramount

4:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Monday October 13, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D

2014, USA, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jonathan Liebesman
Starring: Megan Fox, Will Arnett, William Fichtner, Whoopi Goldberg

The city needs heroes. Darkness has settled over New York City as Shredder and his evil Foot Clan have an iron grip on everything from the police to the politicians. The future is grim until four unlikely outcast brothers rise from the sewers and discover their destiny as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. The Turtles must work with fearless reporter April O'Neil (Megan Fox) and her wise-cracking cameraman Vern Fenwick (Will Arnett) to save the city and unravel Shredder's diabolical plan.(c) Paramount

4:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

Tuesday October 14, 2014

6:45pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:15pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

Wednesday October 15, 2014

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

Thursday October 16, 2014

7:00pm

The Hundred-Foot Journey

2014, USA/United Arab Emirates/India, 119 MINS, PG

Dir: Lasse Hallström
Starring: Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal

A widowed Indian restaurateur (Om Puri), burned out of his Mumbai restaurant by political fanatics, moves to Europe with his five kids to begin again. After false starts in London and Rotterdam, their van breaks down in an old French town.

They find a closed restaurant ideal for their purposes. By bad luck, it’s across the street from an establishment run by Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), who’s obsessed with doubling her one-star rating in the famed Michelin guide. To her mind, hot curries and haute cuisine cannot coexist.

Romance blossoms when one child in the Kadam family, elder brother Hassan (Manish Dayal), displays tremendous talent. He wins over a sous-chef from the French staff (Charlotte Le Bon) and convinces Mallory he could be a genius. But if so, will the wide world snatch him away?  Charlotte Observer, Lawrence Toppman. 


Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2014/08/07/5091625/a-satisfying-mix-of-culture-and.html#.U-Qn34BdWV6#storylink=cpy

9:20pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

Friday October 17, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Saturday October 18, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Sunday October 19, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Monday October 20, 2014

6:40pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Tuesday October 21, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

Wednesday October 22, 2014

7:00pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Thursday October 23, 2014

7:00pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Friday October 24, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Saturday October 25, 2014

2:00pm

The Monster Squad

1987, USA, 82 MINS, 14A

Dir: Fred Dekker
Starring: Andre Gower, Robby Kigger

4:00pm

Private Rental

0 MINS, G

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Sunday October 26, 2014

2:00pm

The Monster Squad

1987, USA, 82 MINS, 14A

Dir: Fred Dekker
Starring: Andre Gower, Robby Kigger

4:00pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Monday October 27, 2014

7:00pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



9:15pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



Tuesday October 28, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Wednesday October 29, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Thursday October 30, 2014

7:00pm

The Trip to Italy

2014, UK, 108 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Winterbottom
Starring: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon, Rosie Fellner

George and Gracie. Abbot and Costello. Hope and Crosby. It might be a bit premature to add Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon to the list of great comedic duos, but a few more films like "The Trip" and "The Trip to Italy" would seal the deal.

In 2010's "The Trip," the pair, playing versions of themselves, were hired to travel around Yorkshire, sampling and reviewing a half-dozen restaurants. Now, as the title implies, they've taken their act to The Continent, zipping around in a Mini Cooper from Piemonte to the Amalfi coast for more of the same. If that makes "The Trip to Italy" seem like a redundant sequel, it shouldn't — it's as funny, and at times as poignant — as its predecessor.

In both films, the scenery and the food are delectable, but the real attraction is the banter and rapport between these quick-witted wiseacres, both skilled impressionists and character actors. Coogan is by far better known in America, thanks most recently to his performance in last year's "Philomena," for which he also received an Oscar nomination as its screenwriter. But both actors (or at least their characters) use snappy patter and sarcasm to deflect their anxiety about never rising to the status of a leading man. They also use jokes to steer around any serious acknowledgment of their fraternal feelings for each other, in a fairly spot-on depiction of male friendship. PORTLAND OREGONIAN, Marc Mohan



9:15pm

The Drop

2014, USA, 106 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michaël R. Roskam
Starring: Tom Hardy, Noomi Rapace, James Gandolfini

"The Drop" is based on "Animal Rescue," a Dennis Lehane short story that took place in Boston, but has been relocated to Brooklyn. Hardy is Bob, the slow-to-comprehend longtime bartender at Cousin Marv's, a dive favored by blue-collar locals and controlled by a Chechen crime figure. The drop in "The Drop" refers to a seemingly random underworld cash drop, which eventually will come to Bob's workplace.

The crime drama is getting attention as the late James Gandolfini's final appearance in a feature film, and it's a memorable farewell. But above all the film is another showcase of Hardy's versatile talents. Roskam and screenwriter Dennis Lehane pile a huge burden on Hardy, forcing him to set the mood and drive the narrative forward with a character whose default is cryptic silence. The rising star responds with a superb lesson in understated acting. San Francisco Chronicle, Peter Hartlaub. 

 



Friday October 31, 2014

7:00pm

The Exorcist

1973, USA, 132 MINS, 14A

Dir: William Friedkin
Starring: Max Von Sydow, Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Jason Miller

In this re-release of the horror classic, a 12 year old girl (Blair) becomes possessed by a malevolent spirit, and her only hope is an exorcism. Two priests are summoned to exorcise the demon.

9:30pm

A Nightmare on Elm Street

1984, USA, 91 MINS, R

Dir: Wes Craven
Starring: Johnny Depp, Heather Langenkamp

A Nightmare on Elm Street is about Nancy Thompson (Heather Langenkamp), a typical teenager with the usual teenage problems - divorced parents, gossipy friends, and a boyfriend who wants a little more than she's willing to offer. Nancy lives in an average house in an average middle America town. Her father, Donald (John Saxon), is a police lieutenant, patrolling the streets and keeping the community safe from all sorts of unsavory things. However, the biggest danger to his friends and family is about to emerge from somewhere he never could have expected: his daughter's subconscious.

ReelViews, James Berardinelli



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