Now Playing

Today - Tuesday September 2, 2014

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

Wednesday September 3, 2014

7:00pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

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9:15pm

X-Men: Days of Future Past

2014, USA/UK, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Hugh Jackman, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender

Director Bryan Singer  returns to the game he started successfully in 2000 with X-Men and continued in 2003 with X2. He does himself proud, combining the pow of his early films with the game-changing playfulness of Matthew Vaughn's 2011 X-Men: First Class, which introduced James McAvoy as the boyish version of Patrick Stewart's telepathic Professor X and Michael Fassbender in a youthful take on Ian McKellen's metal-bending Magneto. McAvoy and Fassbender, both terrific, are still playing out a battle that pits peaceful coexistence against mutant world dominance.

The plot wrinkle supplied by screenwriter Simon Kinberg involves time travel. In the future, murderous robots known as Sentinels are hellbent on wiping out mutants and their human allies. That's when Professor X and Magneto use the powers of Kitty Pryde (Page) to send Wolverine (Jackman) back to 1973, when President Nixon (Camacho) approved the Sentinel plan hatched by übervillain Dr. Trask (Dinklage).  Rolling Stone, Peter Travers 

 

Thursday September 4, 2014

7:00pm

X-Men: Days of Future Past

2014, USA/UK, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Hugh Jackman, James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender

Director Bryan Singer  returns to the game he started successfully in 2000 with X-Men and continued in 2003 with X2. He does himself proud, combining the pow of his early films with the game-changing playfulness of Matthew Vaughn's 2011 X-Men: First Class, which introduced James McAvoy as the boyish version of Patrick Stewart's telepathic Professor X and Michael Fassbender in a youthful take on Ian McKellen's metal-bending Magneto. McAvoy and Fassbender, both terrific, are still playing out a battle that pits peaceful coexistence against mutant world dominance.

The plot wrinkle supplied by screenwriter Simon Kinberg involves time travel. In the future, murderous robots known as Sentinels are hellbent on wiping out mutants and their human allies. That's when Professor X and Magneto use the powers of Kitty Pryde (Page) to send Wolverine (Jackman) back to 1973, when President Nixon (Camacho) approved the Sentinel plan hatched by übervillain Dr. Trask (Dinklage).  Rolling Stone, Peter Travers 

 

9:30pm

Begin Again

2014, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: John Carney
Starring: Keira Knightley, Mark Ruffalo, Adam Levine, James Corden

The new film from Irish director John Carney, writer and director of the indie hit Once, is another movie about music — listening to it, making it, pouring your heart and soul into it. It’s about how a shared love of creating or even just listening to a song can bring people together in a meaningful way

Part fairy tale, part character study, Begin Again stars Keira Knightley as Gretta, a songwriter dumped by her callous pop star boyfriend (Adam Levine) after he has hit the big time and cheated on her. Shattered, Gretta is poised to head home to England but instead is dragged out to open mic night, where a cheery busker friend cajoles her onto the stage. The chatter in the bar rises. She finishes the song gamely, sure nobody’s really paying attention.

But someone is paying attention: flailing music industry executive Dan (Mark Ruffalo at his rumpled, dissolute best), who just got kicked out of his own company. He’s slumped at the bar but galvanized by the opening notes of Gretta’s song. Dan formed his own indie music label back in the day, but in the wake of personal disaster he has abandoned his first passion for the swampy embrace of booze, to the consternation of his partner (Mos Def) and his estranged wife (Catherine Keener). Hell, Dan doesn’t even know the age of his teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld, True Grit). But he does know a good song when he hears it.  Miami Herald, Connie Ogle 

.

Friday September 5, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Saturday September 6, 2014

12:30pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

3:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Sunday September 7, 2014

12:30pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

3:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Monday September 8, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Tuesday September 9, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

Wednesday September 10, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

Thursday September 11, 2014

7:00pm

Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago

2014, USA | Spain, 84 MINS, G

Dir: Lydia Smith

500 miles on foot. Bunk-beds. Blisters. Stunning landscapes. World-class snorers. Hot searing sun, freezing cold rain. Kindness from strangers. Debilitating injury. Unexpected romance. No toilet paper when you really need it. Profound grief and deep doubt. Hunger. Laughing with new friends. Total exhaustion. You are guaranteed to experience all of this when walking the ancient pilgrim path, the Camino de Santiago. 

9:00pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Friday September 12, 2014

7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

Saturday September 13, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

Sunday September 14, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

Monday September 15, 2014

7:00pm

The F Word

2014, Ireland | Canada, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Michael Dowse
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Zoe Kazan, Megan Park

In “The F Word” Radcliffe is Wallace, a sweet if somewhat lost twentysomething who is merely treading water — both personally and professionally. Hurt by a bad breakup that literally led him to leave medical school and work as a writer of technical journals, Wallace just can’t seem to get back on track. A chance meeting with an advertising animator, Chantry (Zoe Kazan), at a party suddenly sparks something inside him. The two instantly click. You sense — as do they — that these two sensitive souls are simpatico. Yet, after swapping a number of clever and witty lines at that initial party, the two go their separate ways. After all, Chantry casually mentioned she lives with her boyfriend, Ben (Rafe Spall), to whom she seems very devoted.

As the situation evolves, both Chantry and Wallace decide they can maintain a platonic friendship — that a man and a woman in 2014 should be able to be buddies. It’s an idea that Wallace’s best male friend, the sex-driven Allan (Adam Driver), sees right through. Chicago Sun-Times, Bill Zwecker 

9:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



Tuesday September 16, 2014

7:00pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



9:15pm

Snowpiercer

2014, USA/France/South Korea/Czech Republic, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joon-ho Bong
Starring: Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris

A stunning, visionary example of dystopian science fiction cinema at its very best, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer (2013) - based in the French graphic novel - is a blockbuster of gargantuan proportions. Starring a cavalcade of well-known faces including Tilda Swinton, Chris Evans and Song Kang-ho, this futuristic allegory beautifully imbues radical social politics with a sharp and intuitive eye for style and action. Upending the social structure of society and transposing it horizontally, the upper-class has become first-class on the Rattling Ark - a gigantic speed train hurtling across a world pushed into a second ice-age due to the meddling of man.

If this colossal locomotive were to stop moving, the last remnants of humanity would freeze to death, making the train's perpetual-motion engine both the beating heart of humankind and an exceptionally prized asset. A literal microcosm of a contemporary neoliberal society, those at the front of the train rule over the rest, with the rich dictating to the complicit, who in turn oppress the poor and underprivileged. However, as history has continually taught us, this type of dictatorship is unsustainable and revolution an inevitability. We thus board the Rattling Ark just as the seeds of disquiet begin to blossom into battle, with Evans' Curtis at the forefront of the uprising. A magnificent tapestry of rich visuals, futurist whimsy and dark social satire, Bong's Snowpiercer certainly isn't your average sci-fi epic. CineVue, Patrick Gamble

Wednesday September 17, 2014

7:00pm

Snowpiercer

2014, USA/France/South Korea/Czech Republic, 126 MINS, 14A

Dir: Joon-ho Bong
Starring: Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, Tilda Swinton, Ed Harris

A stunning, visionary example of dystopian science fiction cinema at its very best, South Korean director Bong Joon-ho's Snowpiercer (2013) - based in the French graphic novel - is a blockbuster of gargantuan proportions. Starring a cavalcade of well-known faces including Tilda Swinton, Chris Evans and Song Kang-ho, this futuristic allegory beautifully imbues radical social politics with a sharp and intuitive eye for style and action. Upending the social structure of society and transposing it horizontally, the upper-class has become first-class on the Rattling Ark - a gigantic speed train hurtling across a world pushed into a second ice-age due to the meddling of man.

If this colossal locomotive were to stop moving, the last remnants of humanity would freeze to death, making the train's perpetual-motion engine both the beating heart of humankind and an exceptionally prized asset. A literal microcosm of a contemporary neoliberal society, those at the front of the train rule over the rest, with the rich dictating to the complicit, who in turn oppress the poor and underprivileged. However, as history has continually taught us, this type of dictatorship is unsustainable and revolution an inevitability. We thus board the Rattling Ark just as the seeds of disquiet begin to blossom into battle, with Evans' Curtis at the forefront of the uprising. A magnificent tapestry of rich visuals, futurist whimsy and dark social satire, Bong's Snowpiercer certainly isn't your average sci-fi epic. CineVue, Patrick Gamble

9:20pm

The Grand Seduction

2014, Canada, 115 MINS, PG

Dir: Don McKellar
Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Brendan Gleeson, Liane Balaban

Tickle Head, a down-on-its-luck fishing village in Canada, wants to lure a recycling plant so everyone can get off welfare, but the company requires that the town have a doctor, which it doesn’t. And so the residents, led by Murray (Brendan Gleeson, the perfect anchor for the proceedings), set about trying to persuade a visiting physician (Taylor Kitsch) to settle in Tickle Head. This involves not only making the town look more appealing than it is but also making it seem to embody all of the doctor’s interests, which are gleaned by eavesdropping on his phone calls. Among other things, residents try to pass themselves off as aficionados of cricket, and the sport may never recover.

The movie, a remake of a 2003 French-language film, has an eclectic supporting cast that includes Mark Critch, Gordon Pinsent and Liane Balaban. Under Don McKellar’s direction, they might have you investigating the possibility of relocating to Tickle Head yourself. The New York Times, Neil Genzlinger



Thursday September 18, 2014

6:30pm

The Fox Turns 100!: Charlie Chaplin in "Tillie’s Punctured Romance"

1914, 0 MINS, G

OnThursday, September 18th, be transported back in time and help us celebrate 100 years of Fox History.  This event which is co-presented by Silent Sundays will feature the early Chaplin hit Tillie’s Punctured Romance, which was released in 1914, the year The Fox opened it’s doors.  This screening will feature live piano accompaniment from William O’Meara.  Prior to the screening we will briefly go over the history of this Toronto landmark, and hand out raffle prizes, while we all enjoy a slice of complimentary cake!  Admission is $10 and includes a drink voucher for use at our concession stand.  Join us in wishing The Fox a Happy 100th Birthday!  The festivities begin at 6:30pm!

9:00pm

Private Rental

0 MINS, G

Friday September 19, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Saturday September 20, 2014

2:00pm

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes 3-D

2014, USA, 130 MINS, PG

Dir: Matt Reeves
Starring: Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Andy Serkis

"Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is an extremely high-functioning sci-fi thriller about extremely high-functioning apes. Some of it may seem silly in the recounting, or in the trailer, but it doesn't feel silly in the theater. Far from it, the film forges ahead, in vivid 3-D, with such energy, expertise and thunderous conviction that you readily accept its basic premise—the pell-mell emergence of great intelligence, plus moral awareness, in primitive bodies—and find yourself exactly where the filmmakers want you to be, swinging giddily between sympathy for the apes and the humans in what threatens to become all-out war. Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

4:30pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Sunday September 21, 2014

2:00pm

The Fox Turns 100!: Bugs Bunny Cartoons, Clowns & Free Popcorn!

0 MINS, G

Continuing our centenary celebration, from 2PM-6PM The Fox will be hosting a fun afternoon filled with clowns, balloons, Bugs Bunny cartoons, free popcorn, and 1914 pricing!  Drop in for a few cartoons or stay the full afternoon! Funny Bunny the Clown will be here from 2PM-4PM with balloon sculptors and face painting. Admission is only a nickel!

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Monday September 22, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Tuesday September 23, 2014

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Wednesday September 24, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Lucy

2014, France, 89 MINS, 14A

Dir: Luc Besson
Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi

Luc Besson's action spectaculars have always operated on a visceral level. Now he has added a cellular level. "Lucy" tracks the explosive growth of cells in its heroine's brain, which has been bumping along at 10% efficiency—the average, we're told, for most of us struggling dummies—until something happens to push her up toward triple digits. The movie tracks more than cell growth, of course, since its title character, played with impressive aplomb by Scarlett Johansson, grows from a vaguely defined student living in Taiwan into the sort of superperson that Nietzsche envisaged, even if he got the gender wrong. At the height of Lucy's powers there is nothing she can't do—talk about a headstrong woman—and something of the same can be said for the film. It doesn't always keep track of its own logic, at least not for this 10-percenter, but it's gleefully bold, visually adventurous, often funny, strikingly concise—the whole heart-pounding tale is 100% entertaining.Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Thursday September 25, 2014

7:00pm

Lucy

2014, France, 89 MINS, 14A

Dir: Luc Besson
Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi

Luc Besson's action spectaculars have always operated on a visceral level. Now he has added a cellular level. "Lucy" tracks the explosive growth of cells in its heroine's brain, which has been bumping along at 10% efficiency—the average, we're told, for most of us struggling dummies—until something happens to push her up toward triple digits. The movie tracks more than cell growth, of course, since its title character, played with impressive aplomb by Scarlett Johansson, grows from a vaguely defined student living in Taiwan into the sort of superperson that Nietzsche envisaged, even if he got the gender wrong. At the height of Lucy's powers there is nothing she can't do—talk about a headstrong woman—and something of the same can be said for the film. It doesn't always keep track of its own logic, at least not for this 10-percenter, but it's gleefully bold, visually adventurous, often funny, strikingly concise—the whole heart-pounding tale is 100% entertaining.Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Friday September 26, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Saturday September 27, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Sunday September 28, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Monday September 29, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Tuesday September 30, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

September 2014

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