Now Playing

Today - Saturday August 30, 2014

1:30pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Sunday August 31, 2014

2:00pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

7:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



9:30pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Monday September 1, 2014

1:30pm

3D Screening

X-Men: Days of Future Past 3-D

2014, USA, 131 MINS, PG

Dir: Bryan Singer
Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman

 

Loosely adapted from the classic Chris Claremont comic storyline of the same name, X-Men: Days of Future Past sees the big screen’s original X-Men (Wolverine, Professor X, Storm, Kitty Pryde, Iceman, Colossus, and even their one-time enemy Magneto) and their latest members (Bishop, Warpath, Sunspot, and Blink) living in a dystopian future where the massive mutant-hunting Sentinels have practically exterminated mutants, incarcerating the surviving ones in concentration camps with the humans who helped them. The only way for the X-Men to survive is to send one of their own back in time telepathically in order to stop the assassination that paved the way for the mutant holocaust. The film's action sequences are well-done and engaging, from its opening scene of the future X-Men falling to the Sentinels to the Paris standoff through to the climactic battle in Washington D.C. 

Days of Future Past is the most ambitious entry in the franchise and also the most rewarding, allowing fans to see the casts of both the original trilogy and First Class join forces in one action-packed, high-stakes, and surprisingly witty adventure film. 

Jim Vejvoda, IGN.com



4:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

7:00pm

Jersey Boys

2014, USA, 134 MINS, 14A

Dir: Clint Eastwood
Starring: John Lloyd Young, Erich Bergen, Michael Lomenda

In the Tony Award-winning musical Jersey Boys — and in director Clint Eastwood’s new movie version of the still-running 2005 Broadway smash — a successful teen songwriter named Bob Gaudio has a “eureka” moment the first time he hears the soaring, distinctive voice of Francis Stephen Castelluccio. Or, as that singer has been known for the better part of his life, Frankie Valli.

Listening to Valli’s range, emotion and vocal pyrotechnics, Gaudio knew he had found his instrument, the ideal interpreter of whatever hit he could dream up.

And once he and Valli partnered with Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi to become The Four Seasons, there were so many hits: Sherry, Big Girls Don’t Cry, Walk Like a Man, Bye Bye Baby. There were also Valli solo hits, like Can’t Take My Eyes Off You and My Eyes Adored You.

If you happened to be young in the 1960s and ’70s, if you had a particular radio-friendly Top 40 taste in music, Valli and the Four Seasons probably supplied the soundtrack to plenty of your coming-of-age adventures.  Miami Herald, Christine Dolan



9:30pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

August 2014

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September 2014

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