Now Playing

Today - Monday July 28, 2014

7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





Tuesday July 29, 2014

7:00pm

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





9:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

Wednesday July 30, 2014

1:00pm

Movies for Mommies

22 Jump Street

2014, USA, 112 MINS, 14A

Dir: Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Starring: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum

College comedies are a genre themselves and 22 Jump Street is a good one. It completely embraces all the college antics it’s allowed to explore this time around. What the movie is really “about” (besides being about itself) is the bond between Hill and Tatum’s Schmidt and Jenko. Like 21 Jump Street, this is a movie about their partnership and figuring out if they’re still crucial to each other or if they’d be better off realizing their differences and taking separate paths. The story is about exploring male friendship, and it does it well.

In the end, 22 Jump Street is hilarious. Never has a movie that’s been this meta been this great, and it’s the funniest comedy of the past few years. The laughs are consistent, and some of them are huge. Most summer blockbusters demand to be seen on the big screen for the spectacle of it, but 22 Jump Street deserves the same ticket price for the experience of it. This is one you’ll want to experience in a packed, laughing theater.

Louie Schuth, hypable.com





7:00pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

9:15pm

The Immigrant

2014, USA, 118 MINS, 14A

Dir: James Gray
Starring: Marion Cotillard, Joaquin Phoenix, Jeremy Renner

In American popular culture, and in the private lore of millions of American families, the immigrant experience of the late-19th and early 20th centuries is often presented as a chronicle of struggle and triumph, a parable of dreams come true. In “The Immigrant,” James Gray tries to push through this rosy nostalgia and recapture some of the terror and strangeness of the journey from the Old World to the New. The first shot is of the Statue of Liberty shrouded in harbor mist, and the film unfolds in the gap between the promise that lady embodies and the harsh realities a newcomer encounters once she gets off the boat.

The newcomer is Ewa Cybulska, a Polish Catholic who has crossed the ocean in 1921 with her sister, in flight from war and deprivation. She is played by Marion Cotillard with a luminous intensity — at once dignified and utterly vulnerable — that brings to mind the stars of silent film. And while “The Immigrant” has dialogue (in several languages) and was shot in color, it feels almost like a lost artifact of the era it depicts. The film is earnestly and unabashedly melodramatic to an extent that may baffle audiences accustomed to clever, knowing historical fictions. But it also has a depth and purity of feeling that makes other movies feel timid and small by comparison. The New York Times,  A.O. Scott



Thursday July 31, 2014

7:00pm

The Immigrant

2014, USA, 118 MINS, 14A

Dir: James Gray
Starring: Marion Cotillard, Joaquin Phoenix, Jeremy Renner

In American popular culture, and in the private lore of millions of American families, the immigrant experience of the late-19th and early 20th centuries is often presented as a chronicle of struggle and triumph, a parable of dreams come true. In “The Immigrant,” James Gray tries to push through this rosy nostalgia and recapture some of the terror and strangeness of the journey from the Old World to the New. The first shot is of the Statue of Liberty shrouded in harbor mist, and the film unfolds in the gap between the promise that lady embodies and the harsh realities a newcomer encounters once she gets off the boat.

The newcomer is Ewa Cybulska, a Polish Catholic who has crossed the ocean in 1921 with her sister, in flight from war and deprivation. She is played by Marion Cotillard with a luminous intensity — at once dignified and utterly vulnerable — that brings to mind the stars of silent film. And while “The Immigrant” has dialogue (in several languages) and was shot in color, it feels almost like a lost artifact of the era it depicts. The film is earnestly and unabashedly melodramatic to an extent that may baffle audiences accustomed to clever, knowing historical fictions. But it also has a depth and purity of feeling that makes other movies feel timid and small by comparison. The New York Times,  A.O. Scott



9:15pm

Belle

2014, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Amma Asante
Starring: Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Matthew Goode, Emily Watson, Tom Felton

In 1769, after the death of her mother, a young Dido Elizabeth Belle (Lauren Julien-Box) is brought to the home of her naval officer father’s uncle to be raised as though she were a legitimate daughter. Though her mother was an African slave, her great uncle Lord Mansfield (Tom Wilkinson) loves her as his own child, despite the complex societal rules that attempt to define her place. As she grows up alongside her cousin Elizabeth (Sarah Gadon), the differences in their futures become ever more stark. As a young woman on the verge of coming out into society, Dido (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) is an heiress, but her mixed racial heritage keeps her from finding an equal match. Meanwhile her beloved, beautiful cousin has little to offer in terms of a dowry, putting her in a difficult position as well.

“Belle” has all the wit and heart of a standard Jane Austen adaptation, but there’s more weight here. Dido and her cousin Elizabeth struggle with issues familiar to fans of Georgian-era-set fiction, particularly class, money, and the role love does or doesn’t play in courtship and marriage. But in addition to that, Asante’s Dido contends with issues of racial and societal identity as she feels like she neither fits with the family who has raised her or the servants to tend to them. Characters’ reactions to Dido and her racial heritage are varied and complex, including horror, exoticization, and respect.  The Playlist, Kimber Myers

July 2014

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August 2014

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