Now Playing

Today - Sunday May 1, 2016

1:45pm

The Little Prince

2016, France/Canada, 108 MINS, PG

Dir: Mark Osborne
Starring: Jeff Bridges, albert brooks, Riley Osborne, Makenzie Foy

 

n this first-ever animated feature film adaptation of the classic novel The Little Prince, a little girl (Mackenzie Foy) lives in a very grown-up world with her mother (Rachel McAdams), who tries to make sure she is prepared for it. Her eccentric, kind‐hearted neighbor, The Aviator (Jeff Bridges), introduces the girl to an extraordinary world that he discovered long ago, where anything is possible. The world of The Little Prince (Riley Osborne).

In the universe of The Little Prince, the little girl goes on a magical journey into her own imagination, where she rediscovers her childhood and learns that what matters most are human connections and the things that can only be seen with the heart.

Based on the classic French novel Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.




4:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

7:00pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



9:15pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Monday May 2, 2016

7:00pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



9:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Tuesday May 3, 2016

7:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

9:15pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



Wednesday May 4, 2016

7:00pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



9:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Thursday May 5, 2016

7:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

9:15pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



Friday May 6, 2016

4:00pm

Hot Docs: The Pearl

2015, USA, 94 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jessica Dimmock, Christopher LaMarca

Set in the hyper-masculine culture of post-industrial logging towns, The Pearl follows four extraordinary transgender women who, having lived in the closet their whole lives, make the decision to transition in their middle and senior years. Beginning at the annual Esprit Conference where transgender women express their true identities, this powerful film follows the women over three years as they grapple with the varying stages of their transitions. Jodi, who can no longer hide her true identity, comes out to her biological brother only to discover a shocking secret they both share. Nina, a 67-year-old retired architect living full-time as male, has kept her secret from her wife of 35 years but now risks the loss of her entire family. And Amy, 72 and coping with loneliness after the death of her wife, opens her home to support other transgender women. - Heather Haynes

7:00pm

Hot Docs: The Legacy of Frida Kahlo

2015, Japan, 89 MINS, G

Dir: Tadasuke Kotani

Award-winning photographer Miyako Ishiuchi travels to Mexico to inventory iconic artist Frida Kahlo's wardrobe and personal belongings when they're suddenly discovered 58 years after her death. Kahlo left behind a wealth of possessions in nearly mint condition—traditional Oaxacan costumes, exquisite embroideries, ornately painted braces, even nail polish and pills—that hint at how she lived. A documentary where fashion and "women's work" are given the respect and importance they deserve, The Legacy of Frida Kahlo captures the artistic process as it unfolds between two artists and two worlds: Japan and Mexico, the living and the dead. Evocative scenes shot on the Day of the Dead add a stirring emotional element to this artistic itemization, and give the impression that bringing back the dead through their second skins—their clothing, talismans and traditions—is well within grasp if the breeze and light are just right. - Angie Driscoll

9:30pm

Hot Docs: What Tomorrow Brings

2016, USA, 89 MINS, PG

Dir: Beth Murphy

In a remote village in Afghanistan is an all-female school, founded and led by spirited humanitarian Razia Jan. In a nation where education for young women is difficult to access and the dropout numbers are high, Jan puts literacy at the forefront, encouraging the girls in their pursuit of knowledge, independence and understanding. Her initiatives are progressive, and her young students embrace the opportunities to learn about their history in hopes of building a better future for themselves and their country. In the midst of many complications, from the influences of the Taliban to international government forces, Jan's school for young female students offers optimism for future generations. Filmmaker Beth Murphy takes her cameras inside the school walls and beyond, giving unfiltered insights to an evolving educational process that affects not only the girls, but the village as a whole. - Gabor Pertic

Saturday May 7, 2016

1:00pm

Hot Docs: Life, Animated

2015, USA, 91 MINS, G

Dir: Roger Ross WIlliams

Owen Suskind couldn't communicate and connect with the world around him. His autism deeply affected his family's ability to understand what their son was trying to express. But soon, communication evolved from a very colourful source: the world of Disney animations. By watching dozens of animated Disney classics, Owen memorized characters and speeches from beloved characters. As his family started to discover his new form of expression, they adopted the scripts and songs, and adapted them in a way to finally bring about deeper connection. Academy Award–winner Roger Ross Williams turns his lens on Owen and the Suskind family to showcase a powerful story of the profound and surprising effects art can have on those who embrace it. - Gabor Pertic




3:45pm

Hot Docs: Sour Grapes

2016, USA/UK/France, 86 MINS, PG

Dir: Jerry Rothwell, Reuben Atlas

Award-winning filmmakers Jerry Rothwell and Reuben Atlas treat Hot Docs audiences to a nail-biting crime documentary about the world’s greatest wine fraud. With pockets full of cash, charisma and a preternatural memory for vintages, a very young Rudy Kurniawan earns the reputation of a wine savant, surrounding himself with some of high society’s most fervent wine connoisseurs. Earning $35 million from the auction of wines from his personal collection, he quickly wins the trust of those in elite wine circles, and is embraced within their community. But when Bill Koch, a top US collector, and, Laurent Ponsot, a Burgundian wine producer, discover suspicious bottles floating through the markets, a suspenseful investigation begins into one of the most ingenious cons of our time. - Heather Haynes

6:30pm

Hot Docs: A Revolution in Four Seasons

2016, USA, 90 MINS, G

This seminal film tells the story of two women with opposing political views fighting for their different versions of a democratic future for Tunisia, the country that sparked the Arab Spring. Over the course of Tunisia's critical post-revolution years, we follow journalist Emna Ben Jemaa, who envisions a country governed by free speech and without the corruption of the former regime. In contrast, Jawhara Ettis of the Islamist party Ennahda works towards a Tunisia guided by Islamic principles. On a public level, both women must navigate how females are treated in their society, while in their own homes they must make difficult choices to balance their public political roles with marriage and motherhood. Both know the stakes are high. The ever-present threat of Islamic extremists means their fragile political process could break down and all they've worked for could be lost. - Heather Haynes

9:15pm

Hot Docs: The Incomparable Rose Hartman with Circles

2015, USA/Sweden, 84 MINS, PG

Dir: Otis Mass, Frida Kempff

The Incomparable Rose Hartman:

Renowned photographer Rose Hartman is no shrinking violet. She doesn't let much get in the way of whatever party, fashion show or opening she wants to shoot, not even an invitation. Some call her brash, some say she's rude, but everyone agrees her shrewd eye has defined the New York City social scene for decades. A fixture at Studio 54, she revelled in stealthily documenting stars like Mick and Bianca Jagger and Andy Warhol. She was the first to move behind the curtains of Fashion Week catwalks to shoot models and designers at work, making quick fans of Donna Karan and Carolina Herrera. But what motivates her to snap the intimate moments of celebrity and fashion? Is she simply working, or is she working to belong? Moving seamlessly between paparazzo, street art and portraiture, Hartman slows down just long enough to allow this energetic profile to capture her for a change. - Myrocia Watamaniuk

Circles: 

A physician returns to Stockholm after a stint with Doctors Without Borders. Her mom wants her to move back home. Her friend advises her to start a family, sooner rather than later, since motherhood is the meaning of life. Does Susanna need kids to feel settled and whole? What if her life's purpose is her career? - Angie Driscoll

Sunday May 8, 2016

2:00pm

The Little Prince

2016, France/Canada, 108 MINS, PG

Dir: Mark Osborne
Starring: Jeff Bridges, albert brooks, Riley Osborne, Makenzie Foy

 

n this first-ever animated feature film adaptation of the classic novel The Little Prince, a little girl (Mackenzie Foy) lives in a very grown-up world with her mother (Rachel McAdams), who tries to make sure she is prepared for it. Her eccentric, kind‐hearted neighbor, The Aviator (Jeff Bridges), introduces the girl to an extraordinary world that he discovered long ago, where anything is possible. The world of The Little Prince (Riley Osborne).

In the universe of The Little Prince, the little girl goes on a magical journey into her own imagination, where she rediscovers her childhood and learns that what matters most are human connections and the things that can only be seen with the heart.

Based on the classic French novel Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.




4:15pm

Sleeping Giant

2015, Canada, 90 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Cividino
Starring: Jackson Martin, Erika Brodzky, Nick Serino

Three boys are thrown together in a small town in cottage country, not far from the towering cliffs of the Sibley Peninsula that give the film its title. The boys’ interactions are physical and competitive as they walk that fine line between childhood and adult life; there’s a lot of jockeying for position and macho daring going on, and despite an idyllic backdrop of sunny days on beautiful Lake Superior, the story is unsettling from the start.

Riley (Reece Moffett) and Nate (Nick Serino) are cousins staying with their grandmother for the summer. Theirs is a working-class family, and the boys’ behaviour suggests a general level of parental neglect. The third boy, Adam (Jackson Martin) is a middle-class kid on holidays with his parents. He has obvious material advantages, perhaps, but it’s quickly made obvious that none of the adults in the story is reliable. - Liz Brain, Toronto Sun

Literally and figuratively, these kids are on their own. Loyalties are tested when the three boys are together, and a sort of triangle is created, causing conflict. That triangle shifts again when Adam’s friend Taylor (Katelyn McKerracher) is on the scene, with her presence adding sexual tension to the mix. It’s a volatile combination of braggadocio, insecurity and hormones, and it’s all leading somewhere disturbing.



7:00pm

Sleeping Giant

2015, Canada, 90 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Cividino
Starring: Jackson Martin, Erika Brodzky, Nick Serino

Three boys are thrown together in a small town in cottage country, not far from the towering cliffs of the Sibley Peninsula that give the film its title. The boys’ interactions are physical and competitive as they walk that fine line between childhood and adult life; there’s a lot of jockeying for position and macho daring going on, and despite an idyllic backdrop of sunny days on beautiful Lake Superior, the story is unsettling from the start.

Riley (Reece Moffett) and Nate (Nick Serino) are cousins staying with their grandmother for the summer. Theirs is a working-class family, and the boys’ behaviour suggests a general level of parental neglect. The third boy, Adam (Jackson Martin) is a middle-class kid on holidays with his parents. He has obvious material advantages, perhaps, but it’s quickly made obvious that none of the adults in the story is reliable. - Liz Brain, Toronto Sun

Literally and figuratively, these kids are on their own. Loyalties are tested when the three boys are together, and a sort of triangle is created, causing conflict. That triangle shifts again when Adam’s friend Taylor (Katelyn McKerracher) is on the scene, with her presence adding sexual tension to the mix. It’s a volatile combination of braggadocio, insecurity and hormones, and it’s all leading somewhere disturbing.



9:00pm

Midnight Special

2016, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Jeff Nichols
Starring: Michael Shannon, Kirsten Dunst, Sam Shepard, Joel Edgerton, Adam Driver

The quietly gripping Midnight Special begins where most thrillers would pause for breath: two armed men, Roy (Michael Shannon) and Lucas (Joel Edgerton), are taking a young boy, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), on a journey. And while the television news says they have abducted the child, Alton is content in their unusually protective care.The unseen kidnapping is not the focus, rather the close dynamic between the trio and the unknown destination that awaits them. - Craig Mathieson, The Age

Monday May 9, 2016

7:00pm

Sleeping Giant

2015, Canada, 90 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Cividino
Starring: Jackson Martin, Erika Brodzky, Nick Serino

Three boys are thrown together in a small town in cottage country, not far from the towering cliffs of the Sibley Peninsula that give the film its title. The boys’ interactions are physical and competitive as they walk that fine line between childhood and adult life; there’s a lot of jockeying for position and macho daring going on, and despite an idyllic backdrop of sunny days on beautiful Lake Superior, the story is unsettling from the start.

Riley (Reece Moffett) and Nate (Nick Serino) are cousins staying with their grandmother for the summer. Theirs is a working-class family, and the boys’ behaviour suggests a general level of parental neglect. The third boy, Adam (Jackson Martin) is a middle-class kid on holidays with his parents. He has obvious material advantages, perhaps, but it’s quickly made obvious that none of the adults in the story is reliable. - Liz Brain, Toronto Sun

Literally and figuratively, these kids are on their own. Loyalties are tested when the three boys are together, and a sort of triangle is created, causing conflict. That triangle shifts again when Adam’s friend Taylor (Katelyn McKerracher) is on the scene, with her presence adding sexual tension to the mix. It’s a volatile combination of braggadocio, insecurity and hormones, and it’s all leading somewhere disturbing.



9:00pm

The Devil's Horn

2016, 86 MINS, PG

Dir: Larry Weinstein
Starring: Gery Dumoulin, David Fox, Vernard Johnson

Pope Pius X denounced it, Hitler banned and mocked it, Stalin sent guys to the Gulag over it and the Ladies’ Home Journal feared its immoral disruptions. That’s the humble saxophone, celebrated in its joyous disrepute by a doc that swings on the road to hell.

Based on Michael Segell’s book of the same title, Larry Weinstein’s exuberant film traces the sax’s start back some 170 years to the workshop of star-crossed Adolphe Sax of Dinant, Belgium.

Sax invented this “serpentine cylinder of brass breathing a sound more deeply human than the human voice,” moving hips and opening ears and minds. Little did he know what social discord it would sow, long before the first electric guitar first rattled uptight elders. - Peter Howell, The Star



Tuesday May 10, 2016

7:00pm

The Devil's Horn

2016, 86 MINS, PG

Dir: Larry Weinstein
Starring: Gery Dumoulin, David Fox, Vernard Johnson

Pope Pius X denounced it, Hitler banned and mocked it, Stalin sent guys to the Gulag over it and the Ladies’ Home Journal feared its immoral disruptions. That’s the humble saxophone, celebrated in its joyous disrepute by a doc that swings on the road to hell.

Based on Michael Segell’s book of the same title, Larry Weinstein’s exuberant film traces the sax’s start back some 170 years to the workshop of star-crossed Adolphe Sax of Dinant, Belgium.

Sax invented this “serpentine cylinder of brass breathing a sound more deeply human than the human voice,” moving hips and opening ears and minds. Little did he know what social discord it would sow, long before the first electric guitar first rattled uptight elders. - Peter Howell, The Star



9:00pm

Sleeping Giant

2015, Canada, 90 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Cividino
Starring: Jackson Martin, Erika Brodzky, Nick Serino

Three boys are thrown together in a small town in cottage country, not far from the towering cliffs of the Sibley Peninsula that give the film its title. The boys’ interactions are physical and competitive as they walk that fine line between childhood and adult life; there’s a lot of jockeying for position and macho daring going on, and despite an idyllic backdrop of sunny days on beautiful Lake Superior, the story is unsettling from the start.

Riley (Reece Moffett) and Nate (Nick Serino) are cousins staying with their grandmother for the summer. Theirs is a working-class family, and the boys’ behaviour suggests a general level of parental neglect. The third boy, Adam (Jackson Martin) is a middle-class kid on holidays with his parents. He has obvious material advantages, perhaps, but it’s quickly made obvious that none of the adults in the story is reliable. - Liz Brain, Toronto Sun

Literally and figuratively, these kids are on their own. Loyalties are tested when the three boys are together, and a sort of triangle is created, causing conflict. That triangle shifts again when Adam’s friend Taylor (Katelyn McKerracher) is on the scene, with her presence adding sexual tension to the mix. It’s a volatile combination of braggadocio, insecurity and hormones, and it’s all leading somewhere disturbing.



Wednesday May 11, 2016

7:00pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



9:00pm

Midnight Special

2016, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Jeff Nichols
Starring: Michael Shannon, Kirsten Dunst, Sam Shepard, Joel Edgerton, Adam Driver

The quietly gripping Midnight Special begins where most thrillers would pause for breath: two armed men, Roy (Michael Shannon) and Lucas (Joel Edgerton), are taking a young boy, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), on a journey. And while the television news says they have abducted the child, Alton is content in their unusually protective care.The unseen kidnapping is not the focus, rather the close dynamic between the trio and the unknown destination that awaits them. - Craig Mathieson, The Age

Thursday May 12, 2016

7:00pm

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2

2016, Canada/USA, 94 MINS, PG

Dir: Kirk Jones
Starring: Nia Vardalos

The sequel finds Toula at a crossroads. Her only child has gone from calling her “Mommy!” with unabashed glee to exasperated moans of “Mother!” when she’s embarrassed by mom; her travel agency has closed down and she’s back working at her parents’ restaurant; and she and her husband are so busy with work and parenting and family issues, the romance has disappeared from their marriage.

Meanwhile, Toula’s parents learn they were never legally married, so they make plans to rectify it, but not without much drama. (Merely going to work and school in the morning comes with much drama for this family. They wouldn’t have it any other way.) Paris feels smothered by her family and is considering attending school a thousand miles away; Gus’ estranged brother is about to visit from Greece, and the neighbors disapprove of the loud histrionics of the family that has four — count ’em, four — side-by-side houses on one street in an otherwise quiet neighborhood. Richard Roeper-Chicago Sun-Times

 



9:00pm

Midnight Special

2016, 111 MINS, PG

Dir: Jeff Nichols
Starring: Michael Shannon, Kirsten Dunst, Sam Shepard, Joel Edgerton, Adam Driver

The quietly gripping Midnight Special begins where most thrillers would pause for breath: two armed men, Roy (Michael Shannon) and Lucas (Joel Edgerton), are taking a young boy, Alton (Jaeden Lieberher), on a journey. And while the television news says they have abducted the child, Alton is content in their unusually protective care.The unseen kidnapping is not the focus, rather the close dynamic between the trio and the unknown destination that awaits them. - Craig Mathieson, The Age

Friday May 13, 2016

7:00pm

45 Years

2015, UK, 95 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Haigh
Starring: Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay

On a Monday morning, six days before Kate (Rampling) and Geoff (Courtenay) are set to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary with a hundred of their closest friends, a letter arrives. Written in German, the letter explains how Geoff’s first love, Katja, has been found, perfectly preserved in ice, 50 years after she fell to her death during an Alpine hiking expedition with Geoff.  It is part of his history. But it is threatening to rewrite their history, Kate’s and Geoff’s, this sudden reemergence of his Katja, and Kate’s dawning realization that this woman she never met has shaped the course of her marriage. If the letter is an earthquake, 45 Years is the story of its many aftershocks. - Austin Chronicle

9:15pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Saturday May 14, 2016

2:00pm

Labyrinth

1986, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jim Henson
Starring: David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly and Toby Froud

Journey into the fantastical world of Labyrinth, starring David Bowie and a cast of incredible creatures created by Jim Henson and produced by the Master of Myth, George Lucas! Frustrated with babysitting on yet another weekend night, Sarah, a teenager with an active imagination, summons the Goblins from her favorite book, Labyrinth, to take her baby stepbrother away. When little Toby actually disappears, Sarah must follow him into the world of the fairy tale to rescue him from the wicked Goblin King (Bowie)! Guarding his castle is The Labyrinth itself, a twisted maze of deception, populated with outrageous characters and unknown dangers. To get through it in time to save Toby, Sarah will have to outwit the King by befriending the very Goblins who protect him, in hopes that their loyalty isn't just another illusion in a place where nothing is as it seems! "I couldn't wish for a movie with more imagination or fun!" says critic Leonard Maltin.

4:15pm

45 Years

2015, UK, 95 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Haigh
Starring: Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay

On a Monday morning, six days before Kate (Rampling) and Geoff (Courtenay) are set to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary with a hundred of their closest friends, a letter arrives. Written in German, the letter explains how Geoff’s first love, Katja, has been found, perfectly preserved in ice, 50 years after she fell to her death during an Alpine hiking expedition with Geoff.  It is part of his history. But it is threatening to rewrite their history, Kate’s and Geoff’s, this sudden reemergence of his Katja, and Kate’s dawning realization that this woman she never met has shaped the course of her marriage. If the letter is an earthquake, 45 Years is the story of its many aftershocks. - Austin Chronicle

7:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

9:15pm

Demolition

2016, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Chris Cooper, Naomi Watts, Jake Gyllenhaal

When his father-in-law tells him that “If you want to fix something, you have to take it apart,” Davis takes the metaphor literally. A coffee machine that his wife purchased before she died, the squeaky bathroom stall door at his suffocating one-percenter job and the entire structure of his luxurious house are all victims of his “deconstructo-mania.” Numbed by his cold, corporate world and the remnants of an unsatisfying marriage, Davis’ demolishing eventually turns inwards, introspecting the memories of his wife, searching for a warm relationship he barely remembers. In the interim, he stocks a vending machine company’s customer service worker (Naomi Watts), who is lonely and having troubles with her angst-ridden son. - Josh Cabrita, The Young Folks

Sunday May 15, 2016

2:00pm

Labyrinth

1986, 101 MINS, PG

Dir: Jim Henson
Starring: David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly and Toby Froud

Journey into the fantastical world of Labyrinth, starring David Bowie and a cast of incredible creatures created by Jim Henson and produced by the Master of Myth, George Lucas! Frustrated with babysitting on yet another weekend night, Sarah, a teenager with an active imagination, summons the Goblins from her favorite book, Labyrinth, to take her baby stepbrother away. When little Toby actually disappears, Sarah must follow him into the world of the fairy tale to rescue him from the wicked Goblin King (Bowie)! Guarding his castle is The Labyrinth itself, a twisted maze of deception, populated with outrageous characters and unknown dangers. To get through it in time to save Toby, Sarah will have to outwit the King by befriending the very Goblins who protect him, in hopes that their loyalty isn't just another illusion in a place where nothing is as it seems! "I couldn't wish for a movie with more imagination or fun!" says critic Leonard Maltin.

4:15pm

45 Years

2015, UK, 95 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Haigh
Starring: Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay

On a Monday morning, six days before Kate (Rampling) and Geoff (Courtenay) are set to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary with a hundred of their closest friends, a letter arrives. Written in German, the letter explains how Geoff’s first love, Katja, has been found, perfectly preserved in ice, 50 years after she fell to her death during an Alpine hiking expedition with Geoff.  It is part of his history. But it is threatening to rewrite their history, Kate’s and Geoff’s, this sudden reemergence of his Katja, and Kate’s dawning realization that this woman she never met has shaped the course of her marriage. If the letter is an earthquake, 45 Years is the story of its many aftershocks. - Austin Chronicle

7:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

9:15pm

Demolition

2016, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Chris Cooper, Naomi Watts, Jake Gyllenhaal

When his father-in-law tells him that “If you want to fix something, you have to take it apart,” Davis takes the metaphor literally. A coffee machine that his wife purchased before she died, the squeaky bathroom stall door at his suffocating one-percenter job and the entire structure of his luxurious house are all victims of his “deconstructo-mania.” Numbed by his cold, corporate world and the remnants of an unsatisfying marriage, Davis’ demolishing eventually turns inwards, introspecting the memories of his wife, searching for a warm relationship he barely remembers. In the interim, he stocks a vending machine company’s customer service worker (Naomi Watts), who is lonely and having troubles with her angst-ridden son. - Josh Cabrita, The Young Folks

Monday May 16, 2016

7:00pm

45 Years

2015, UK, 95 MINS, 14A

Dir: Andrew Haigh
Starring: Charlotte Rampling, Tom Courtenay

On a Monday morning, six days before Kate (Rampling) and Geoff (Courtenay) are set to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary with a hundred of their closest friends, a letter arrives. Written in German, the letter explains how Geoff’s first love, Katja, has been found, perfectly preserved in ice, 50 years after she fell to her death during an Alpine hiking expedition with Geoff.  It is part of his history. But it is threatening to rewrite their history, Kate’s and Geoff’s, this sudden reemergence of his Katja, and Kate’s dawning realization that this woman she never met has shaped the course of her marriage. If the letter is an earthquake, 45 Years is the story of its many aftershocks. - Austin Chronicle

9:00pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Tuesday May 17, 2016

7:00pm

Demolition

2016, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Chris Cooper, Naomi Watts, Jake Gyllenhaal

When his father-in-law tells him that “If you want to fix something, you have to take it apart,” Davis takes the metaphor literally. A coffee machine that his wife purchased before she died, the squeaky bathroom stall door at his suffocating one-percenter job and the entire structure of his luxurious house are all victims of his “deconstructo-mania.” Numbed by his cold, corporate world and the remnants of an unsatisfying marriage, Davis’ demolishing eventually turns inwards, introspecting the memories of his wife, searching for a warm relationship he barely remembers. In the interim, he stocks a vending machine company’s customer service worker (Naomi Watts), who is lonely and having troubles with her angst-ridden son. - Josh Cabrita, The Young Folks

9:15pm

The Lobster

2015, USA/UK/France/Ireland/Greece/Netherlands, 118 MINS, R

Dir: Yorgos Lanthimos
Starring: Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and John C. Reilly star in the deliciously bizarre new film from Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos (DogtoothALPS), about a curious hotel where the residents are charged with finding a new mate within 45 days — under penalty of being transformed into animals should they fail.

David (Colin Farrell) has just been left by his wife, which means that — as with all those in this society who are without a partner — he must report to a secluded hotel and search for a new mate amongst the other residents. If the guests fail to find a partner within 45 days, they are promptly transformed into animals and sent out into the wild. (As he likes the sea, David registers to become a lobster in case of failure to hook up.) Though David at first tries to abide by the rules, he soon becomes appalled by the hotel's rigidly enforced regime and escapes into the woods, where he finds shelter with a band of runaways and is drawn to a fellow outcast (Rachel Weisz). Making his first English-language feature and working with a star-filled international cast — which also includes John C. Reilly, Ben Whishaw, Léa Seydoux, and his marvellous past collaborators Ariane Labed and Angeliki Papoulia — Lanthimos not only preserves but enhances the unique mood, tone, and imaginative freedom of his previous works. - TIFF

Wednesday May 18, 2016

6:45pm

The Lobster

2015, USA/UK/France/Ireland/Greece/Netherlands, 118 MINS, R

Dir: Yorgos Lanthimos
Starring: Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz

Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and John C. Reilly star in the deliciously bizarre new film from Greek auteur Yorgos Lanthimos (DogtoothALPS), about a curious hotel where the residents are charged with finding a new mate within 45 days — under penalty of being transformed into animals should they fail.

David (Colin Farrell) has just been left by his wife, which means that — as with all those in this society who are without a partner — he must report to a secluded hotel and search for a new mate amongst the other residents. If the guests fail to find a partner within 45 days, they are promptly transformed into animals and sent out into the wild. (As he likes the sea, David registers to become a lobster in case of failure to hook up.) Though David at first tries to abide by the rules, he soon becomes appalled by the hotel's rigidly enforced regime and escapes into the woods, where he finds shelter with a band of runaways and is drawn to a fellow outcast (Rachel Weisz). Making his first English-language feature and working with a star-filled international cast — which also includes John C. Reilly, Ben Whishaw, Léa Seydoux, and his marvellous past collaborators Ariane Labed and Angeliki Papoulia — Lanthimos not only preserves but enhances the unique mood, tone, and imaginative freedom of his previous works. - TIFF

9:15pm

Demolition

2016, 100 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jean-Marc Vallée
Starring: Chris Cooper, Naomi Watts, Jake Gyllenhaal

When his father-in-law tells him that “If you want to fix something, you have to take it apart,” Davis takes the metaphor literally. A coffee machine that his wife purchased before she died, the squeaky bathroom stall door at his suffocating one-percenter job and the entire structure of his luxurious house are all victims of his “deconstructo-mania.” Numbed by his cold, corporate world and the remnants of an unsatisfying marriage, Davis’ demolishing eventually turns inwards, introspecting the memories of his wife, searching for a warm relationship he barely remembers. In the interim, he stocks a vending machine company’s customer service worker (Naomi Watts), who is lonely and having troubles with her angst-ridden son. - Josh Cabrita, The Young Folks

Thursday May 19, 2016

6:45pm

Purple Rain

1984, 110 MINS, 14A

Dir: Albert Magnoli
Starring: Prince, Apollonia Kotero, Morris Day

A talented singer tries to escape his troubled home life through his music. However, his arrogant nature puts him in danger of alienating his band and losing the fellow performer he loves to a charismatic rival. - John Ferguson, RadioTimes

9:15pm

Hail, Caesar!

2016, USA/UK, 106 MINS, PG

Dir: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Starring: Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum, Frances McDormand, Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Scarlett Johansson

“Hail, Caesar!” is a comedy, and a scintillating, uproarious one, filled with fast and light touches of exquisite incongruity in scenes that have the expansiveness of relaxed precision, performed and timed with the spontaneous authority of jazz. Hollywood has been ripe for lampooning from the start, but, for all the movie’s incisive humor, the Coens don’t so much mock the movie colony as look on with an unusually benign astonishment at the contrast—only superficially a contradiction—between the absurd wonders of the movies that were made at the time and the even more absurd stories of their making.

The Coen brothers are into belief systems—big and seemingly backward ideas that overcome contradictions with a leap of faith—and “Hail, Caesar!” is full of them, from the very first shot, an image of a sculpted Christ on the crucifix. The movie follows Eddie for a very busy day and a half through his official rounds as the head of physical production for Capitol Pictures Studios, sometime in 1951. 

Eddie is a fixer—getting starlets out of self-made jams, threatening and cajoling the press into keeping embarrassing stories out of the news—and his biggest problem is with a movie that’s in production. It’s called “Hail, Caesar! A Tale of the Christ,” a historical-religious drama that’s also a grand vehicle for one of the biggest stars of the day, Baird Whitlock (George Clooney), who plays a Roman consul, a leader of the persecutors of Jesus who becomes a Christian convert at the foot of the Cross. During the shoot, Baird disappears and Eddie tries to keep the story out of the gossip columns (which are superintended by Tilda Swinton). Then Eddie gets a ransom note for Baird, and, without involving the law, he attempts to handle the kidnapping on his own. 

Eddie copes with a diverse slate of movies and the distinctive personalities who populate them. Hobie Doyle (Alden Ehrenreich), the folksy young rodeo star of an acrobatic musical-Western, is inserted as the romantic lead of a drawing-room drama by the hyper-refined British director Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes), whose name alone suggests a wide range of gags, which the Coens exploit to the hilt. The shimmery froth of a Busby Berkeley–like water-ballet musical stars a hardboiled and tough-talking hedonist (played by Scarlett Johansson with a chewy New York accent that’s a step from Jean Hagen’s Lina Lamont in “Singin’ in the Rain”) whose pregnancy Eddie needs to finesse. There’s also a bouncy musical of sailors about to ship out, starring a popular song-and-dance man named Burt Gurney (Channing Tatum), who’s the subject of scurrilous gossip that Eddie works to suppress.

For each of these movies, the Coens offer loving parodies—scenes from these films-within-a-film that suggest the hyperbolic rapture of an effective studio spectacle. 

Richard Brody-The New Yorker

Friday May 20, 2016

7:00pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Saturday May 21, 2016

2:00pm

E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

1982, USA, 120 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Henry Thomas, Dee Wallace-Stone, Drew Barrymore

An alien botanist is left behind on an expedition to Earth, and befriends alienated middle child Elliott (Henry Thomas), who christens him ET. Elliott and ET form a close bond, and the benevolent little brown creature manages to bring together a family. With E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, Spielberg triumphantly succeeds in bringing the magical to the everyday. Film 4



4:15pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

7:00pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Sunday May 22, 2016

1:45pm

E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

1982, USA, 120 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Henry Thomas, Dee Wallace-Stone, Drew Barrymore

An alien botanist is left behind on an expedition to Earth, and befriends alienated middle child Elliott (Henry Thomas), who christens him ET. Elliott and ET form a close bond, and the benevolent little brown creature manages to bring together a family. With E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, Spielberg triumphantly succeeds in bringing the magical to the everyday. Film 4



4:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

7:15pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Monday May 23, 2016

2:00pm

E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

1982, USA, 120 MINS, PG

Dir: Steven Spielberg
Starring: Henry Thomas, Dee Wallace-Stone, Drew Barrymore

An alien botanist is left behind on an expedition to Earth, and befriends alienated middle child Elliott (Henry Thomas), who christens him ET. Elliott and ET form a close bond, and the benevolent little brown creature manages to bring together a family. With E.T. The Extra Terrestrial, Spielberg triumphantly succeeds in bringing the magical to the everyday. Film 4



4:15pm

A Hologram for the King

2016, 98 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom Tykwer
Starring: Tom Hanks, Alexander Black

In which an American business deal turns into a personal sanity-keeping mission. As information-technology salesman Alan Clay, who is assigned to pitch an IT system to a Saudi royal... Clay’s feeling of culpability applies to his personal life as well as his profession. Formerly an exec who facilitated China’s takeover of the Schwinn bicycle company, Clay suffers remorse brought on by his father’s scorn for “hollowing out [our] economy” and by the distance his divorce creates from his college-age daughter — all manifested in fatigue and physical ailments. - Armond White, National Review

7:15pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Tuesday May 24, 2016

7:00pm

A Hologram for the King

2016, 98 MINS, 14A

Dir: Tom Tykwer
Starring: Tom Hanks, Alexander Black

In which an American business deal turns into a personal sanity-keeping mission. As information-technology salesman Alan Clay, who is assigned to pitch an IT system to a Saudi royal... Clay’s feeling of culpability applies to his personal life as well as his profession. Formerly an exec who facilitated China’s takeover of the Schwinn bicycle company, Clay suffers remorse brought on by his father’s scorn for “hollowing out [our] economy” and by the distance his divorce creates from his college-age daughter — all manifested in fatigue and physical ailments. - Armond White, National Review

9:15pm

The Lady in the Van

2015, UK, 104 MINS, PG

Dir: Nicholas Hytner
Starring: Maggie Smith, Alex Jennings

Based on Alan Bennett's memoir and hit West End play, this brilliantly witty, "mostly true" story chronicles an unlikely friendship between a writer and the elderly eccentric who takes over his driveway.

All sorts of people wash up in Camden, the London borough where playwright Alan Bennett (Alex Jennings) buys himself a house just big enough for him and his roommate, Alan Bennett (also Alex Jennings). "The writer is double," Bennett explains. "There is the self who does the writing and there is the self who does things." This is a story about the one who, however reluctantly, does things — like allow Miss Mary Shepherd (the inimitable Dame Maggie Smith) to park in his driveway. Miss Shepherd is homeless. Ornery, impolite, and bullying, she claims to take advice from the Virgin Mary. And she smells bad. But Alan, despite his very private nature, takes pity on her and says she can stay there for three months.

Perhaps he's also a little curious. Where did she find this van? Where did she learn French? And who is that strange man (Jim Broadbent) who keeps coming round in the middle of the night? Miss Shepherd seems to have led a life so much more interesting than Alan's. Perhaps some of that interest will rub off on him. There will certainly be plenty of time for that to happen as she tests the limits of his hospitality, stretching the three months into fifteen years.

The Lady in the Van is playful, inventive, and relentlessly funny. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys) with swift pacing and a seasoned sense of mischief, the film reminds us of the value of taking a chance on strangers — and of the long road that gradually turns strangers into friends. - TIFF

Wednesday May 25, 2016

7:00pm

Miles Ahead

2016, USA, 100 MINS, 18A

Dir: Don Cheadle
Starring: Ewan McGregor, Don Cheadle

It’s set in the late 1970s, when Davis, hailed as a brilliant innovator, has stopped playing and is nose-deep in cocaine. He lives in a brownstone in Manhattan where a pushy reporter named Dave Brill (Ewan McGregor), purporting to be from Rolling Stone magazine, shows up for an interview. Davis can’t get rid of him, so he uses him as a driver to take him around town.

 

They start at Columbia studios where Davis, armed with a loaded pistol, wants to collect a $20,000 cheque his says the company owes him. Later, they take part in that car chase, an odd couple who bicker and bond — Davis wanting little but money and drugs, Brill looking for a story and a foothold. - Jay Stone, The Ex-Press



9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Thursday May 26, 2016

7:00pm

Miles Ahead

2016, USA, 100 MINS, 18A

Dir: Don Cheadle
Starring: Ewan McGregor, Don Cheadle

It’s set in the late 1970s, when Davis, hailed as a brilliant innovator, has stopped playing and is nose-deep in cocaine. He lives in a brownstone in Manhattan where a pushy reporter named Dave Brill (Ewan McGregor), purporting to be from Rolling Stone magazine, shows up for an interview. Davis can’t get rid of him, so he uses him as a driver to take him around town.

 

They start at Columbia studios where Davis, armed with a loaded pistol, wants to collect a $20,000 cheque his says the company owes him. Later, they take part in that car chase, an odd couple who bicker and bond — Davis wanting little but money and drugs, Brill looking for a story and a foothold. - Jay Stone, The Ex-Press



9:15pm

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3-D

2016, USA, 151 MINS, 14A

Dir: Zack Snyder
Starring: Amy Adams, Ben Affleck, Henry Cavill, Diane Lane

Batman (Ben Affleck) and Superman (Henry Cavill) clash over differing philosophies about what kind of heroism is needed to protect the world, while the public they're defending is becoming increasingly mindful of the damage that superheroes and masked vigilantes cause. However, the duo are soon forced to confront an even greater threat created by nefarious billionaire Lex Luthor (Jesse Eisenberg). Directed by Zack Snyder, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice also co-stars Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Jeremy Irons as Alfred the butler, and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. - Jack Rodgers, Rovi

Friday May 27, 2016

7:00pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




9:15pm

Everybody Wants Some!!

2016, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Blake Jenner, Tyler Hoechlin, Wyatt Russell

We begin with Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) pulling into the parking lot of the fictitious Southeast Texas State University in August 1980, ready to start his freshman year on a baseball scholarship. The rest of the movie takes place in the three days leading up to his first class, as Jake gets hazed in “voluntary” (i.e. mandatory) practices, gets to know his teammates with whom he shares a house, and catches the eye of a theater student named Beverly (Zoey Deutch) who introduces him to a world outside the jock circles he usually travels in. - Kristian Lin, FW Weekly

Saturday May 28, 2016

2:00pm

The Neverending Story

1996, 94 MINS, G

Dir: Wolfgang Petersen
Starring: Noah Hathaway, Barret Oliver, Tami Stronach

On his way to school, Bastian (Barret Oliver) ducks into a bookstore to avoid bullies. Sneaking away with a book called "The Neverending Story," Bastian begins reading it in the school attic. The novel is about Fantasia, a fantasy land threatened by "The Nothing," a darkness that destroys everything it touches. The kingdom needs the help of a human child to survive. When Bastian reads a description of himself in the book, he begins to wonder if Fantasia is real and needs him to survive.

4:15pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




7:00pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




9:15pm

Everybody Wants Some!!

2016, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Blake Jenner, Tyler Hoechlin, Wyatt Russell

We begin with Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) pulling into the parking lot of the fictitious Southeast Texas State University in August 1980, ready to start his freshman year on a baseball scholarship. The rest of the movie takes place in the three days leading up to his first class, as Jake gets hazed in “voluntary” (i.e. mandatory) practices, gets to know his teammates with whom he shares a house, and catches the eye of a theater student named Beverly (Zoey Deutch) who introduces him to a world outside the jock circles he usually travels in. - Kristian Lin, FW Weekly

Sunday May 29, 2016

2:00pm

The Neverending Story

1996, 94 MINS, G

Dir: Wolfgang Petersen
Starring: Noah Hathaway, Barret Oliver, Tami Stronach

On his way to school, Bastian (Barret Oliver) ducks into a bookstore to avoid bullies. Sneaking away with a book called "The Neverending Story," Bastian begins reading it in the school attic. The novel is about Fantasia, a fantasy land threatened by "The Nothing," a darkness that destroys everything it touches. The kingdom needs the help of a human child to survive. When Bastian reads a description of himself in the book, he begins to wonder if Fantasia is real and needs him to survive.

4:15pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




7:00pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




9:15pm

Everybody Wants Some!!

2016, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Blake Jenner, Tyler Hoechlin, Wyatt Russell

We begin with Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) pulling into the parking lot of the fictitious Southeast Texas State University in August 1980, ready to start his freshman year on a baseball scholarship. The rest of the movie takes place in the three days leading up to his first class, as Jake gets hazed in “voluntary” (i.e. mandatory) practices, gets to know his teammates with whom he shares a house, and catches the eye of a theater student named Beverly (Zoey Deutch) who introduces him to a world outside the jock circles he usually travels in. - Kristian Lin, FW Weekly

Monday May 30, 2016

7:00pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




9:15pm

Everybody Wants Some!!

2016, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Blake Jenner, Tyler Hoechlin, Wyatt Russell

We begin with Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) pulling into the parking lot of the fictitious Southeast Texas State University in August 1980, ready to start his freshman year on a baseball scholarship. The rest of the movie takes place in the three days leading up to his first class, as Jake gets hazed in “voluntary” (i.e. mandatory) practices, gets to know his teammates with whom he shares a house, and catches the eye of a theater student named Beverly (Zoey Deutch) who introduces him to a world outside the jock circles he usually travels in. - Kristian Lin, FW Weekly

Tuesday May 31, 2016

6:45pm

Everybody Wants Some!!

2016, USA, 104 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Blake Jenner, Tyler Hoechlin, Wyatt Russell

We begin with Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) pulling into the parking lot of the fictitious Southeast Texas State University in August 1980, ready to start his freshman year on a baseball scholarship. The rest of the movie takes place in the three days leading up to his first class, as Jake gets hazed in “voluntary” (i.e. mandatory) practices, gets to know his teammates with whom he shares a house, and catches the eye of a theater student named Beverly (Zoey Deutch) who introduces him to a world outside the jock circles he usually travels in. - Kristian Lin, FW Weekly

9:15pm

Eye in the Sky

2016, UK, 102 MINS, 14A

Dir: Gavin Hood
Starring: Alan Rickman, Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul

A fascinating look at how our leaders wage war now, Eye in the Sky takes us into the control rooms and shipping containers where military personnel make decisions that could result in the deaths of people thousands of miles away. Featuring Helen Mirren, Aaron Paul, and Alan Rickman, the latest from Tsotsi director Gavin Hood is enormously pertinent and eerily entertaining.

The goal of British-led Operation Cobra is the capture of Aisha Al Hady (Lex King), a radicalized British citizen who has joined the Somali terrorist group Al Shabab. But their "capture" objective is changed to "kill" when the indomitable Colonel Katherine Powell (Mirren), who has been tracking Al Hady for years, learns that Al Shabab is planning suicide attacks. Nevada-based drone operator Steve Watts (Paul) targets Al Shabab's Nairobi safehouse but reports back to London that a nine-year-old girl has entered the kill zone. Given the value of the target, could a civilian child be chalked up to collateral damage? Is the potential political fallout worth the risk?

Written by Guy Hibbert with an unerring ear for military doublespeak, Eye in the Sky becomes blackly comic as the officers' concern with optics sparks a protracted game of bureaucratic pass-the-buck, with everyone "referring up" the chain of command, through the UK Foreign Secretary (who has food poisoning) and the US Foreign Secretary (busy attending a ping pong tournament in China) all the way up to the Prime Minister. Shades of Dr. Strangelove abound — though, as with the Kubrick classic, Eye in the Sky is only as funny as it is because the truths it arrives at are so very grave and resonant. - TIFF




May 2016

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