Now Playing

Today - Sunday September 21, 2014

10:00am

Dark Side of the Chew (RSVP to info@takeactionfilms.com)

0 MINS, G

You are invited to an exclusive private screening of Andrew Nisker's latest project, Dark Side of the Chew, which will be premiering on TVO in the late fall.

Please RSVP to info@takeactionfilms.com with your full name and  phone number to ensure you have a seat.

Andrew will be there to greet you and answer any questions.

2:00pm

The Fox Turns 100!: Bugs Bunny Cartoons, Clowns & Free Popcorn!

0 MINS, G

Continuing our centenary celebration, from 2PM-6PM The Fox will be hosting a fun afternoon filled with clowns, balloons, Bugs Bunny cartoons, free popcorn, and 1914 pricing!  Drop in for a few cartoons or stay the full afternoon! Funny Bunny the Clown will be here from 2PM-4PM with balloon sculptors and face painting. Admission is only a nickel!

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Monday September 22, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

Tuesday September 23, 2014

7:00pm

Chef

2014, USA, 115 MINS, 14A

Dir: Jon Favreau
Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson

Chef is a chewy, stick-to-your-ribs sort of film: a bit of cinematic soul food, filled with delicious imagery and colourful characters. But the meat of this movie, directed by and starring Jon Favreau, is the battle between commerce and creativity. In the film, Carl is an L.A. celebrity chef stuck in a rut. On the day a major food blogger comes to dinner, the restaurant's owner (Hoffman) lays down the law: "Play the hits." Out goes his bold, new flavours. In comes the lava cake.

Performed with relish by Oliver Platt, the blogger destroys Carl in his review. When the chef makes the mistake of replying via Twitter — well, you can imagine. Soon, Carl finds himself on a road trip: he's downsizes to a food truck.

Chef is a film for the senses that belongs on a playlist next to delectable food-centred titles like Big Night and The Trip. The screen sizzles with its cooking scenes, which are accented by a soundtrack of Latino and soul music.

 

Eli Glasner, CBCNews

9:15pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Wednesday September 24, 2014

7:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Lucy

2014, France, 89 MINS, 14A

Dir: Luc Besson
Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi

Luc Besson's action spectaculars have always operated on a visceral level. Now he has added a cellular level. "Lucy" tracks the explosive growth of cells in its heroine's brain, which has been bumping along at 10% efficiency—the average, we're told, for most of us struggling dummies—until something happens to push her up toward triple digits. The movie tracks more than cell growth, of course, since its title character, played with impressive aplomb by Scarlett Johansson, grows from a vaguely defined student living in Taiwan into the sort of superperson that Nietzsche envisaged, even if he got the gender wrong. At the height of Lucy's powers there is nothing she can't do—talk about a headstrong woman—and something of the same can be said for the film. It doesn't always keep track of its own logic, at least not for this 10-percenter, but it's gleefully bold, visually adventurous, often funny, strikingly concise—the whole heart-pounding tale is 100% entertaining.Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Thursday September 25, 2014

7:00pm

Lucy

2014, France, 89 MINS, 14A

Dir: Luc Besson
Starring: Scarlett Johansson, Morgan Freeman, Min-sik Choi

Luc Besson's action spectaculars have always operated on a visceral level. Now he has added a cellular level. "Lucy" tracks the explosive growth of cells in its heroine's brain, which has been bumping along at 10% efficiency—the average, we're told, for most of us struggling dummies—until something happens to push her up toward triple digits. The movie tracks more than cell growth, of course, since its title character, played with impressive aplomb by Scarlett Johansson, grows from a vaguely defined student living in Taiwan into the sort of superperson that Nietzsche envisaged, even if he got the gender wrong. At the height of Lucy's powers there is nothing she can't do—talk about a headstrong woman—and something of the same can be said for the film. It doesn't always keep track of its own logic, at least not for this 10-percenter, but it's gleefully bold, visually adventurous, often funny, strikingly concise—the whole heart-pounding tale is 100% entertaining.Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

9:00pm

Magic in the Moonlight

2014, USA, 98 MINS, PG

Dir: Woody Allen
Starring: Colin Firth, Antonia Clarke, Natasha Andrews. Emma Stone

Woody Allen's "Magic in the Moonlight" stars Emma Stone as a psychic medium, Sophie Baker, and Colin Firth as a master magician who sets out to debunk her. Ms. Stone is entrancing, whether Sophie is in or out of her trance state, and so is the movie as a whole.

The time is the 1920s and the setting is the Côte d'Azur, basking in the gauzy warmth of Darius Khondji's cinematography. Mr. Firth's conjuror, a haughty Englishman named Stanley Crawford, has come to the south of France at the request of an old friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney). Howard worries that a rich American family is being fleeced by the alluring Sophie, and Stanley, who performs under the stage name of Wei Ling Soo, makes a specialty of unmasking fake psychics. 

"Magic in the Moonlight" is filled with flavorsome performances: Mr. McBurney's Howard; Eileen Atkins as Stanley's Aunt Vanessa; Marcia Gay Harden as Sophie's mother; Hamish Linklater as her fatuous suitor; Jacki Weaver as her wealthy sponsor, or her mark. The production is minor in its scale, but not in its substance, which amounts to a summing up of themes that Mr. Allen has explored throughout his creative life: his abiding pessimism, his relentless questioning—often couched as kidding on the square—of life's meaning. It's all the more remarkable, then, that the film's most powerful magic lies in its unquenchable playfulness.  Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern. 

Friday September 26, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Saturday September 27, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Sunday September 28, 2014

2:00pm

How To Train Your Dragon 2 3-D

2014, USA, 102 MINS, PG

Dir: Dean DeBlois
Starring: Jay Baruchel, Cate Blanchett, Gerard Butler

When last seen on the big screen four years ago, Hiccup had bonded with an injured dragon he named Toothless, proved that dragons could be man's best friends, and won his father's respect in the process. Now, barely out of his teens (though still voiced with wry charm by Jay Baruchel), he's faced with grave responsibilities—his father wants him to lead the tribe—and beset by self-doubt: "I know I'm not my father, and I never met my mother, so what does that make me?"

What that makes him, in the context of impending events, is a phenomenally confident self-doubter. A very bad guy named Drago, Hiccup learns, is threatening the tribe with a dragon army. The hero's father, Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler), responds to the threat by shutting the city's gates and preparing for war. Hiccup, however, climbs aboard Toothless and seeks Drago out, hoping to show the mad tyrant the error of his ways.

Gleeful and smart, funny and serious, this sequel surpasses the endearing original with gorgeous animation—a dragon Eden, a dragon scourge, an infinitude of dragons—and one stirring human encounter after another.  The Wall Street Journal, Joe Morgenstern

4:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Monday September 29, 2014

7:00pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

9:20pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



Tuesday September 30, 2014

6:30pm

Boyhood

2014, USA, 164 MINS, 14A

Dir: Richard Linklater
Starring: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke

Few filmmakers ever make a great movie. Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with "Boyhood."

This film is so different it really needs to be described. It's a fictional drama about a boy in Texas, from age 6 through 18. Conceived from the outset as a 12-year-project, it was filmed between 2001 and 2013. You see kids grow up. You see the adults get older. You see the phones and video games get more sophisticated. Nothing is flashed onto the screen to indicate the year. The film plays out like life, one day flowing into the next.

If great art consists of finding an ideal balance between planning and improvisation, "Boyhood" is one of the cinema's glorious examples. Going in, Linklater knew the general outline of his story, but he didn't know that 9/11 would happen, or that Lady Gaga would become famous, or that Ellar Coltrane, who plays the central character, would become a handsome teenager. He worked with the actors he had, and with the world as he found it. San Francisco Chronicle, Mick LaSalle.



9:40pm

A Most Wanted Man

2014, USA/UK/Germany, 121 MINS, 14A

Dir: Anton Corbijn
Starring: Grigoriy Dobrygin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Homayoun Ershadi

An inescapable melancholy pervades the espionage film “A Most Wanted Man,” a smart, bluntly effective adaptation of John le Carré’s post-9/11 political passion play about good, evil and the sins committed in the name of national security. It’s no surprise that the weight of that day and its aftermath hangs over the story, which finds expression in the atmospheric gloom of Hamburg, the port city in which most of the story unfolds, and in the movie’s assembly of crushed and deflated souls. Most of all, there’s the presence of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Günther Bachmann, a German intelligence officer and man of sorrows driven by his uncompromising belief in himself.

The movie has been shrewdly customized by the screenwriter Andrew Bovell and directed by Anton Corbijn, who have managed to make the story seem both topical and redolent of an earlier espionage age, partly by turning it into a character study. This is the last movie completed by Mr. Hoffman, who died in February, which invests it with a gravity that could easily have overwhelmed a less practiced director. Here, though, Mr. Hoffman’s intensity is well served by Mr. le Carré’s intricate web-weaving and Mr. Corbijn’s complementary visual style, the sinister doings dovetailing with the dark tone and colors. Mr. Hoffman’s performance is so finely etched — and the story so irresistible — that the film becomes, almost inescapably, something of a last testament. The New York Times, Manohla Dargis

September 2014

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